Dutch uncle, talk (to one) like a

Dutch uncle

One who addresses someone severely or critically. Fred is always lecturing me like a Dutch uncle, forgetting the fact that I'm 40 years old!
See also: Dutch, uncle

like a Dutch uncle

In a stern, frank, and candid manner. I know I'm talking to you like a Dutch uncle, but these are hard truths you need to hear. If your company is going to survive, you need someone who's willing to advise you like a Dutch uncle when necessary.
See also: Dutch, like, uncle

talk to (one) like a Dutch uncle

To criticize or reprove someone in a stern, frank, and candid manner. I know I'm talking to you like a Dutch uncle, but these are hard truths you need to hear. If your company is going to survive, you need someone who's willing to talk to you like a Dutch uncle when necessary.
See also: Dutch, like, talk, to, uncle
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Dutch uncle

a man who gives frank and direct advice to someone. (In the way an uncle might, but not a real relative.) I would not have to lecture you like a Dutch uncle if you were not so extravagant. He acts more like a Dutch uncle than a husband. He's forever telling her what to do in public.
See also: Dutch, uncle
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Dutch uncle

A stern, candid critic or adviser, as in When I got in trouble with the teacher again, the principal talked to me like a Dutch uncle . This expression, often put as talk to one like a Dutch uncle, presumably alludes to the sternness and sobriety attributed to the Dutch. [Early 1800s]
See also: Dutch, uncle
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Dutch uncle, talk (to one) like a

A person who reproves or criticizes someone severely. Dating from the early nineteenth century, the term appeared in print in Joseph C. Neal’s Charcoal Sketches (1837). The precise origin is not known, but it is probably safe to presume that the Dutch were considered a stern, sober people, admirably suited to giving someone a talking-to in no uncertain terms.
See also: Dutch, like, talk
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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