drown out

(redirected from Drowned Out)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

drown out

1. To force someone out of one's home, often due to flooding. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drown" and "out." Unfortunately, that hurricane drowned us out, and we've been staying with relatives ever since.
2. To use or create a louder noise to make a different, often unpleasant, noise less audible. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drown" and "out." I immediately turned up the TV in an attempt to drown out my brother's tuba practice.
See also: drown, out

drown someone or something out

[for a sound] to be so loud that someone or something cannot be heard. The noise of the passing train drowned out our conversation. The train drowned us out.
See also: drown, out

drown someone (or an animal) out

[for a flood] to drive someone or an animal away from home. The high waters almost drowned the farmers out last year. The water drowned out the fields.
See also: drown, out

drown out

Overwhelm with a louder sound, as in Their cries were drowned out by the passing train. [Early 1600s]
See also: drown, out

drown out

v.
To muffle or mask some sound with a louder sound: I turned up my TV in order to drown out the noise coming from next door. The protesters drowned the speaker out.
See also: drown, out
References in periodicals archive ?
Sadly, for those of us watching tonight's clash between Wales and England in a pub, Invers' peerless intros and easy charm may well be drowned out by ribald songs and belching.
Ab Ioan warned that if action was not taken soon Wales would be "so full of foreigners in our own land that our voice will be drowned out for ever along with our language and culture".
Mr Ab Ioan warned that, if action is not taken soon, Wales will be 'so full of foreigners in our own land that our voice will be drowned out forever along with our language and culture'.
If we don't we'll be so full of foreigners in our own land that our voice will be drowned out forever.
Micha's magnificent words ring down the succeeding centuries of christendom, as relevant and challenging today as when they were first written, still not quite drowned out in the cacophony of materialism: "And what doth the Lord require of thee?