drop names

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drop names

To mention important people as if they are one's friends or associates, usually in an attempt to receive preferential treatment. A: "I know Jim, the owner, OK?" B: "You can drop names all you want, but you're still not getting into this restaurant any time soon."
See also: drop, name
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

drop names

 and drop someone's name
to mention a name or the names of important or famous people as if they were personal friends. (See also drop someone's name.) Mary always tries to impress people by dropping the name of some big-time executives she claims to know. Bill's such a snob. Leave it to him to drop the names of all the local gentry.
See also: drop, name
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

drop names

Refer to important persons as acquaintances in order to impress the listener. For example, Her habit of dropping names made everyone very skeptical about her veracity. [Mid-1900s]
See also: drop, name
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

drop names

refer frequently to well-known people in such a way as to imply that they are close acquaintances.
See also: drop, name
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

drop ˈnames

mention famous people you know or have met in order to impress others ▶ ˈname-dropping noun: I can’t stand all this name-dropping! Does he really know Brad Pitt?
See also: drop, name
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

name dropping

Also, to drop names. Mentioning the names of famous persons to imply that one is on familiar terms with them. The term dates from the mid-1900s. J. D. Salinger had an amusing take on it in Franny and Zooey (1962): “There’s an unwritten law that people in a certain social or financial bracket may name drop as much as they like just as long as they say something terribly disparaging about the person as soon as they’ve dropped his name.”
See also: dropping, name
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dropping Names (Ernie Books, pounds 16.99) www.davidbenedictus.com I TWENTY years ago Julian West had just made a hash of a law degree and was pondering his future.
Part of his fun is referencing nearly all of the literary lions who've said something about consumer culture, borrowing styles and dropping names along the way.
Although, at times, Simmons comes across like he's at a celebrity mixer, dropping names and titles like rapper Ludacris throws bows.
The pitfalls of the wide focus are vividly illustrated by Jennifer Michaels's piece on 'Confronting the Nazi Past', which squeezes fifty years of East German and West German attitudes to fascism into eighteen pages, dropping names in a manner that serves the interests of neither student nor specialist.
He kept dropping names of stars he said he knew like Brad Pitt and Madonna.
Huyssen's overall style of writing is organized and clear, but he has the unfortunate habit of so many academics of dropping names far too frequently and unnecessarily.
To avoid unwanted duplicates or dropping names that appear to be dupes but are not, clearly indicate the end result you desire from a merge-purge.
is dropping names, and this time, the name is its own.
Without dropping names and identifying cities or provinces, PNP chief Police General Oscar Albayalde also said on Monday that some local chief executives are 'still not serious in the war on drugs until now.'
Since CES 2019 and the Cupertino event, Apple has stated its interest on services and has not been dropping names of their devices for 2019.
Mbadi - without dropping names - claimed that some MPs are compromised by witnesses to either defend them or be their 'mouthpieces' when they appear before committees of Parliament.