draw blood

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draw blood

1. To take blood from one, as with a needle in a medical setting. The doctor wants to draw blood to see what my cholesterol levels are. We just need to draw some blood before the surgery.
2. To injure one or oneself to the point of bleeding. That bit of tissue is on my face because I drew blood while shaving this morning. I can't believe that skinny little kid drew blood when he punched the bully in the nose!
3. By extension, to cause one to become very angry or emotional. I'm usually a calm person, but Addison always manages to say something that draws blood.
See also: blood, draw

draw blood

 
1. Lit. to hit or bite (a person or an animal) and make a wound that bleeds. The dog chased me and bit me hard, but it didn't draw blood. The boxer landed just one punch and drew blood immediately.
2. Fig. to anger or insult a person. Sally screamed out a terrible insult at Tom. Judging by the look on his face, she really drew blood. Tom started yelling and cursing, trying to insult Sally. He wouldn't be satisfied until he had drawn blood, too.
See also: blood, draw

draw blood

Injure someone physically or emotionally. For example, The bullet skimmed his shoulder and barely drew any blood, or That reviewer really knows how to draw blood. This term alludes to drawing blood for diagnostic purposes.
See also: blood, draw
References in periodicals archive ?
They're the boss, you have to - you have to listen to them, you have to stop and she did not stop." The court was satisfied that the nurse-expert had properly stated the applicable standard of care for drawing blood. The court was not satisfied that there was adequate testimony that the alleged negligence was the "proximate cause" of the injuries.
LEGAL COMMENTARY: The plaintiff presented testimony from the nurse-expert which provided the standard of care for drawing blood. The nurse-expert had also testified that she considered the blood draw performed to have breached the standard of care.
In a picture of someone appearing to be drawing blood in MLOT!
She plans to take the research one step farther by drawing blood samples during the night to see if healthy HIV-positives have elevated levels of these lymphokines.
Moreover, drawing blood specimens simultaneously from different venipuncture sites may help ensure that the blood is drawn before antibiotics are administered.
The work, if verified, would give scientists an easier way to study the channel because white blood cells can be obtained by drawing blood and are easily cultured.
"Successful Strategies for Difficult Draws." The most challenging situations healthcare professionals face when drawing blood samples for laboratory testing include geriatric, oncology, pediatric, needle-phobic, obese, and intensive-care patients.
The experimental process, called LDL-pheresis, involves drawing blood from a patient, running it through a device that strips out the LDL and returning the blood to the patient.
Because the testing drive offers financial incentives to blood donors and those drawing blood, the newspaper reports that the initiative has been criticized by some AIDS organizations, while the foundation says the payments are crucial for bringing people face to face with outreach workers.
Moreover, where deuterium oxide dilution requires drawing blood and underwater weighing requires immersion in a calibrated pool, the infrared technique can be completed in three minutes and may ultimately require no more than the rolling up of one's sleeve.
A The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) is quite detailed in its venipuncture standard on the proper procedure for drawing blood from a patient receiving IV fluids.
Drawing blood above an IV is a risky proposition, even when it is temporarily discontinued.
At the bedside, caregivers scan patients' identification bracelets before drawing blood, ensuring positive patient identification.
This low prevalence has prompted the recommendation that phlebotomists drawing blood from volunter donors should not wear gloves, because doing so might frighten donors, giving them the impression that they can get AIDS from giving blood.
"However, some regional blood banks have adopted a policy of wearing gloves when drawing blood from volunteer donors.