Doctor Livingstone, I presume?

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Related to Dr Livingstone: Henry Morton Stanley

Doctor Livingstone, I presume?

A humorous greeting. The phrase refers to Scottish explorer David Livingstone, who was presumed lost in Africa in the mid-19th century. When reporter H.M. Stanley finally located him, he supposedly greeted Livingstone with this now-famous phrase. You must be the gentleman I'm looking for—Doctor Livingstone, I presume?
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Doctor Livingstone, I presume?

Jocular You are who I think you are, are you not? Oh, there you are. Doctor Livingstone, I presume?
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Doctor Livingstone, I presume?

A 19th-century explorer named Dr. David Livingstone became something of a national hero through his articles and lectures about his adventures in Africa. In 1864, Livingstone led an expedition to discover the source of the Nile. When little to nothing was heard from or about Livingstone after many years, Europeans and Americans became concerned. In 1871, the publisher of the New York Herald hired Henry Stanley, a newspaper reporter, to find Livingstone. Heading a group of some two hundred men, Stanley headed into the African interior. After nearly eight months he found Livingstone in a small village on the shore of Lake Tanganyika. As Stanley described the encounter, “As I advanced slowly toward him I noticed he was pale, looked wearied . . . I would have embraced him, only, he being an Englishman, I did not know how he would receive me; so I . . . walked deliberately to him, took off my hat, and said, ‘Dr. Livingstone, I presume?' The phrase “‘Dr. Livingstone, I presume?” caught the public's fancy, and any number of would-be wits greeted friends with it until the phrase lost all traces of cleverness. But that never stopped people from continuing to use it long past the public's memory of who Livingstone or Stanley were.
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References in periodicals archive ?
While other applications for Peek are being validated in Kenya, the children's testing will take place in the UK, Dr Livingstone confirmed.
Dr Livingstone was the first European to see a waterfall in southern Africa, which he named Victoria Falls – after the Queen.
TWO Ark Royals, the boat Dr Livingstone used to explore the Zambezi and Cunard's second Mauretania are among the many ships to have been built at Birkenhead's Cammell Laird dockyard.
I presume Dr Livingstone had never heard of glamping, but even a 19th Century Scots Protestant missionary would have appreciated our heated tents, luxury bed linen and fluffy robes.
Almost exactly 100 years later, Dr Livingstone spent the same day searching for four lost goats, but he never found them.
NA April 05) please let me inform you that the Tokaleya people, who are indigenous to the area surrounding Victoria Falls, did not call the falls Mosi-oa-Tunya before the arrival of Dr Livingstone to that area.
He was also the man who commissioned Henry Morton Stanley to search for Dr Livingstone.
He was wearing a pith helmet and called Dr Livingstone.
The museum is planning to show a number of exhibitions including some of the works of famous "Welsh Shakespeare" Twm o'r Nant, a Welsh language dramatist and poet, letters, books and a plaster cast of a hand from the Denbigh explorer HM Stanley, who found fame after finding lost missionary Dr Livingstone in present day Tanzania, and records of Denbigh's history dating back to the thirteenth century.
As Scotland and Africa get ready to mark his birthday, two Scots tell BRIAN McIVER how they have been inspired by the legacy of Dr Livingstone.
Pat Phelan's gelding got the better of City Press in a tight finish at Kempton in December and followed up in similarly gritty fashion here 12 days ago, with Dr Livingstone back in second.
Despite being rather brief, Dr Livingstone, I Presume?
discovery" of the Victoria Falls by Dr Livingstone.
Last week, a second behind Dr Livingstone in a jumpers' bumper at Kempton should have put him spot-on for this return to timber.
Now a tourism centre for nearby Victoria Falls, local respect for Dr Livingstone is such that it is one of the few large settlements in Zambia to retain a non-African name following independence.