Dorian Gray


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Dorian Gray

A nickname applied to someone who doesn't seem to age. The phrase refers to the titular character in Oscar Wilde's novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, who makes a deal with an artist so that a painting of him ages, but he does not. Your grandfather must be like Dorian Gray because he doesn't look 70, let alone 90!
See also: gray

Dorian Gray

Someone who never appears to age. In his novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde told the story of the title character who made a Faustian arrangement with an artist to paint his portrait, the proviso being that Gray would not age, but the face in his painting would. As with such pacts, Gray lived to rue it. It didn't take long before “Dorian Gray” was applied to anyone who showed no signs of aging. If, for example, after ten or twenty years you met a long-lost friend who looked much the same as when you last saw him or her, you would acknowledge that miracle as “Hey, it's Dorian Gray.” And if your friend recognized the allusion, the reply was likely to be, “Yeah, but you should see the painting in my attic.”
See also: gray
References in classic literature ?
Your rank and wealth, Harry; my brains, such as they are--my art, whatever it may be worth; Dorian Gray's good looks--we shall all suffer for what the gods have given us, suffer terribly."
"Dorian Gray? Is that his name?" asked Lord Henry, walking across the studio towards Basil Hallward.
I want you to explain to me why you won't exhibit Dorian Gray's picture.
I turned half-way round and saw Dorian Gray for the first time.
What the invention of oil-painting was to the Venetians, the face of Antinous was to late Greek sculpture, and the face of Dorian Gray will some day be to me.
I forget; but it is what Dorian Gray has been to me.
"Harry," he said, "Dorian Gray is to me simply a motive in art.
Some day I will show the world what it is; and for that reason the world shall never see my portrait of Dorian Gray."
As long as I live, the personality of Dorian Gray will dominate me.
She told me she had discovered a wonderful young man who was going to help her in the East End, and that his name was Dorian Gray. I am bound to state that she never told me he was good-looking.
Dorian Gray is in the studio, sir," said the butler, coming into the garden.
Iarla Manny's "Oscar as (Ovid as) Orpheus: Misogyny and Pederasty in Dorian Gray and Metamorphoses" reviews the data in Wilde's "Historical Criticism" notebook as well as The Commonplace Book, indicating that while Wilde had the analysis and research to refute his comment regarding Roman historians, Wilde chose not to include it in his submitted "Historical Criticism" essay.
As the long-lost daughter of Oscar Wilde's infamous manipulator, Dorian Gray, Bryony appears to have inherited some of her father's supernatural capabilities.
4 Who wrote The Picture of Dorian Gray? 5 In musical notation, what does a dot to the right of a note do?
Who wrote the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, published in