donkey's ears

donkey's ears

An exceptionally long period of time. The phrase likely originated as rhyming slang, where "ears" rhymes with "years" and alludes to the length of a donkey's ears. Throughout time, it became more popularized as "donkey's years." I haven't seen Jim in donkey's ears! How's he doing these days? It's been donkey's ears since we last got together like this.
See also: ear
References in periodicals archive ?
"What I think is that Nicols Maduro is increasingly showing his donkey's ears. Here what we are seeing is not only that he has hosted Colombian terrorists for many years, but once again ratifies that Venezuela is a sanctuary for terrorists and drug traffickers, "said the President.
If I see my donkey's ears drooping, it means that it will rain."
For example, when a participant asked her children to bring her donkey to its welfare assessment, the two children kicked it in the ribs, smacked it on the shoulders, and tugged on the donkey's ears until it moved.
The force of the tremor was so strong that it snapped off one of the two large "Donkey's Ears", towering twin rock outcroppings that form a distinctive part of the peak's craggy profile, officials said.
Then an opposite journey began in Dante's Drumkit and Dunn's increasing doubts about whether it was possible (and desirable) to sustain that imaginary fink were later strengthened in The Donkey's Ears. Similarly to Elegies, The Year's Afternoon and, finally, Invisible Ink provide plain expressions of Dunn's denial of the usefulness of poetry in terms of laying down the imaginative foundations of public solidarity.
A THE expression was originally "donkey's ears" and it refers to the creatures having long ears.
This led me to a sequence of images and stories from antiquity to the present of girls in animal skins: the ancient cult of Artemis that dressed girls in bearskins in the borderlands to do a ritual dance to ward off sexual life from coming on too soon; the tale of St Dymphna, patron saint of the mentally ill, who ran away with a monk to escape her father's incestuous advances, wearing a jester's hat (donkey's ears); the literary fairy tales of the seventeenth century onward that echo St Dymphna's tale of girls running away in bearskins, cat skins, donkey skins.
But it was yours truly who was left with the donkey's ears at Aintree yesterday when Master Minded bounced back to something like his best with an imperious performance under Ruby Walsh.
There will be puppets, a big bassoon, a peckish bird, a king who grew donkey's ears and of course, stories from the incredible Scheherazade.
Audiences of three to six year olds and their parents can hear about the king who grew donkey's ears, the minotaur trapped in a maze and a little boy who learned to fly.
But just when it appeared the GOP's New England few had traded their elephantine credentials for donkey's ears, it seems they have rediscovered the meaning of being in the loyal opposition.
Mr Browne from Gosforth says the original expression was "donkey's ears", which are very long.
A cardinal who annoyed him is immortalised in the bottom right-hand corner of the piece, depicted as having donkey's ears and with a serpent nibbling at his nether parts.
Behind the windows of this glassy, impermeable office building are people who clamp on the donkey's ears, or the elephant's trunk, not even alternately but at the same time.