Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Treat other people the way you would like to be treated yourself. Based on the words of Jesus at his Sermon on the Mount (and known widely as The Golden Rule), variations of the phrase have been a core doctrine of societal ethics throughout modern human history. I told my son the only way to get along with people is to do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
See also: have, other, unto

do unto others as you would have them do unto you

Behave toward others as you would like to have them behave toward you, as in Of course I'll help him out; it's a case of do unto others, and I may be in the same boat one day . This so-called golden rule is stated in just about every ancient writing about behavioral precepts (including the New Testament, Talmud, Koran, and the Analects of Confucius). Among the earliest appearances in English is Earl Rivers' translation of a saying of Socrates ( Dictes and Sayenges of the Philosophirs, 1477): "Do to other as thou wouldst they should do to thee, and do to none other but as thou wouldst be done to." It is so well known that it is often shortened.
See also: have, other, unto
References in periodicals archive ?
The Kilcooleys' action was simply part of their habitual practice of the Golden Rule--to do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
The first is The Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Law enforcement personnel can achieve such understanding quite simply by remembering the "Golden Rule": Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
It's one of the first lessons many parents, teachers and ministers like to drill into young minds: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.