do unto others


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do unto others

The so-called golden rule, that is, behave toward others as you would have them behave toward you; also, the converse, do not do to others what you would not like done to yourself. The sources for this statement are manifold: Confucius, Aristotle, the New Testament, the Koran, the Talmud. It continued to turn up in such sources as McGuffey’s Reader (1837): “You know, my child, the Bible says that you must always do to other people, as you wish to have them do to you.” George Bernard Shaw, never one to be put off by age-old precepts, quipped, “Do not do unto others as you would they should unto you. Their tastes may not be the same” (Maxims for Revolutionists, 1902).
See also: other, unto
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a saying Time will always prove true Do unto others As you would have done to youI learnt this at My mother's knee Time's gone so quickly since She told it to me.
After all, the Golden Rule is: "do unto others what you would have them do to you", and not "do unto others what they have done tO you".
Rather than starting with the traditional Christian ethic "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you," which makes the self the source of morality, he begins with what I would describe as "see others as they see your otherness." (28) We are all other to each other, making humans of all races and faiths mutually interdependent.
He would most likely have cited the inspired wisdom of sages like Confucius, who said, "Do not do unto others what you would not want done to you." And he would have commissioned his Chinese followers to spread the good news of God's salvation to the whole world.
Parker clarified that dealers and mill buyers "have the right to question each other," but urged attendees to adhere to rules of courtesy and good behavior, including being humble, respecting the dignity of the individual and adhering to the golden rule: Do unto others as you would have them to unto you.
The philosophy that shapes his personal and professional relationships is simply the Golden Rule: "Do unto others, as you would have done unto you."
Do Unto Others by Kristin Lattany Ballantine, January 2000, $24.00, ISBN 0-345-40708-3
"Walk a mile in another's (non-leather) moccasins before passing judgment." "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." We know these platitudes well, and yet our own intense desires for justice often conflict with the empathy necessary to make these "golden rules" work for us.
The first is The Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
My preferred version reads simply: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." Can there be a more cogent moral teaching than that?
It's nature's form of the Golden Rule: "Do unto others as they have done unto you." So until the other creature shows it intends to harm you, you trust it.
Dyson: The golden rule - do unto others as you would have them do unto you - is particularly suited to the Net.
Sagan begins with an amusing summary of the well-known golden rule and less-familiar dicta such as the iron rule ("Do unto others as you like, before they do it unto you") and the tin rule ("Suck up to those above you, and abuse those below").
Because I believe at the root of all these various theories is a simple, practical idea that was best phrased about 2000 years ago: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."
Law enforcement personnel can achieve such understanding quite simply by remembering the "Golden Rule": Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.