disease

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Related to Diseases: Communicable diseases
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a cure worse than the disease

1. Literally, any drug, surgery, procedure, etc., used to cure or mitigate a disease or ailment that ultimately leads to worse symptoms than the original condition caused or might have caused. While the drug has proven to be effective in combating the disease, it has also been shown to ravage the body in other, more devastating ways. It seems at this point like a cure worse than the disease.
2. By extension, a solution to a problem or crisis that leads to worse conditions overall than the original problem did or would have. The board of directors' plan to deal with the economic downturn is to reduce the entire company to a skeleton crew. I know drastic action needs to be taken, but we want to make sure this isn't a cure worse than the disease! I know you want to stimulate the financial sector, but repealing federal regulations would be a cure worse than the disease.
See also: cure, disease, worse

a treatment worse than the disease

1. Literally, any drug, surgery, procedure, etc., used to cure or mitigate a disease or ailment that ultimately leads to worse symptoms than the original condition caused or might have caused. While the drug has proven to be effective in combating the disease, it has also been shown to ravage the body in other, more devastating ways. It seems at this point like a treatment worse than the disease.
2. By extension, a solution to a problem or crisis that leads to worse conditions overall than the original problem did or would have. The board of directors' plan to deal with the economic downturn is to reduce the entire company to a skeleton crew. I know drastic action needs to be taken, but we want to make sure this isn't a treatment worse than the disease! I know you want to stimulate the financial sector, but repealing federal regulations would be a treatment worse than the disease.
See also: disease, treatment, worse

Christmas disease

Hemophilia (or haemophilia) B, a blood-clotting disorder in which a mutation of the Factor IX gene leads to a deficiency of Factor IX (or Christmas factor), a serine protease of the coagulation system. Both the factor and the disease are named for Stephen Christmas (not the holiday), the first patient discovered to have the condition in 1952. We haven't let our daughter participate in any more physical sports since she was diagnosed with Christmas disease last year.
See also: Christmas, disease

desperate diseases must have desperate remedies

proverb Extreme and undesirable circumstances or situations can only be resolved by resorting to equally extreme actions. I know that the austerity measures introduced by the government during the recession are unpopular, but desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.

diseases of the soul are more dangerous than those of the body

proverb Mental and emotional pain is more painful and more difficult to treat than a physical ailment. The quote is attributed to Marcus Tullius Cicero, a Roman statesman and philosopher. Therapists and psychiatrists are vitally important to our society. Diseases of the soul are more dangerous than those of the body, after all.

down with (an illness)

Sick with a particular illness, which is named after "with." I've been down with the flu all week and have barely gotten out of bed.
See also: down

foot-in-mouth disease

A habit of unintentionally saying foolish, tactless, or offensive things. He has foot-in-mouth disease, especially when he's forced to speak for too long, so try to get him off stage as soon as possible. Oh man, do I have foot-in-mouth-disease—I just congratulated Sarah's sister on being pregnant. She isn't.
See also: disease

shake off

1. To rid or free oneself from someone or something that one finds aggravating, upsetting, or annoying. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shake" and "off." My little brother has been following me around all day. I need to shake him off. He had a hard time shaking off the feeling that someone was spying on him.
2. To shake something in order to get something off of it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shake" and "off." I had to shake off the old tarp to get the bugs and dirt off of it. Shake the blanket off before you lay it out.
3. To dislodge or get rid of something by shaking. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shake" and "off." He tried to shake the tick off, but it had dug itself into his skin. Don't shake the mud off inside—go out in the back yard and do it!
4. To recover from or fend off a disease or illness, especially a minor one. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shake" and "off." I've got to shake this tummy bug off—I can't afford to be sick before our big meeting! I've had this cold for nearly a week that I just can't seem to shake off! I could feel myself getting sick, but I managed to shake it off.
See also: off, shake

the British disease

That which supposedly plagues British people, government, or society. Used especially in reference to an inability or unwillingness to be as productive as possible. The real British disease is not complacency or unrest, but the desire to achieve short-term goals at the cost of investing in long-term, sustainable economic policies.
See also: British, disease

the cure is worse than the disease

1. Literally, the drug, surgery, procedure, etc., used to cure or mitigate a disease or ailment ultimately leads to worse symptoms than the original condition caused or might have caused. While the drug has proven to be effective in combating the disease, it has also been shown to ravage the body in other, more devastating ways. It seems at this point that the cure is worse than the disease.
2. By extension, the solution to a problem or crisis leads to worse conditions overall than the original problem did or would have. Often used in negative constructions for rhetorical effect. The board of directors' plan to deal with the economic downturn is to reduce the entire company to a skeleton crew. I know drastic action needs to be taken, but we want to make sure the cure isn't worse than the disease! I know you want to repeal federal regulations to stimulate the financial sector, but that will inevitably lead to gross misconduct throughout the industry. Sometimes the cure is worse than the disease.
See also: cure, disease, worse

the disease to please

A constant need to make others happy. I think you're miserable because you have the disease to please. Try doing what makes you happy instead.
See also: disease, please

the treatment is worse than the disease

1. Literally, the drug, surgery, procedure, etc., used to cure or mitigate a disease or ailment ultimately leads to worse symptoms than the original condition caused or might have caused. While the drug has proven to be effective in combating the disease, it has also been shown to ravage the body in other, more devastating ways. It seems at this point that the treatment is worse than the disease.
2. By extension, the solution to a problem or crisis leads to worse conditions overall than the original problem did or would have. Often used in negative constructions for rhetorical effect. The board of directors' plan to deal with the economic downturn is to reduce the entire company to a skeleton crew. I know drastic action needs to be taken, but we want to make sure the treatment isn't worse than the disease! I know you want to repeal federal regulations to stimulate the financial sector, but that will inevitably lead to gross misconduct throughout the industry. Sometimes the treatment is worse than the disease.
See also: disease, treatment, worse

white man's disease

1. Any disease or illness most prevalent among, or believed to only be contracted by, Caucasian people. Because I am of Indian descent, my friends and family couldn't believe I'd come down with multiple sclerosis, which they all refer to as a white man's disease.
2. slang The perceived inability of Caucasian men to jump as high as African-American men, especially in relation to basketball. He'd be such a better shooting guard if he didn't have white man's disease.
See also: disease, white
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.

Prov. If you have a seemingly insurmountable problem, you must do things you ordinarily would not do in order to solve it. Fred: All my employees have been surly and morose for months. How can I improve their morale? Alan: Why not give everyone a raise? Fred: That's a pretty extreme suggestion. Alan: Yes, but desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.

(the) disease to please

an obsessive need to please people. I, like so many, am afflicted with the disease to please. I am just too nice for my own good.
See also: disease, please

*down with a disease

ill; sick at home. (Can be said about many diseases. *Typically: be ~; Come ~; get~.) Tom isn't here. He's down with a cold. Sally is down with the flu.
See also: disease, down

foot-in-mouth disease

the tendency to say the wrong thing at the wrong time. I suffer a lot from foot-in-mouth disease. Well, Ralph has foot-in-mouth disease again.
See also: disease

shake a disease or illness off

Fig. [for the body] to fight off a disease or illness. I thought I was catching a cold, but I guess I shook it off. I hope I can shake off this flu pretty soon.
See also: disease, illness, off, shake

shake someone or something off

Fig. to get rid of someone; to get free of someone who is bothering you. Stop bothering me! What do I have to do to shake you off? I wish I could shake off John. He's such a pest!
See also: off, shake

shake something off

to get rid of something that is on one by shaking. (See also shake a disease or illness off.) I tried to shake the spider off. The dog shook off the blanket Billy had put on him.
See also: off, shake
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

foot in one's mouth, put one's

Say something foolish, embarrassing, or tactless. For example, Jane put her foot in her mouth when she called him by her first husband's name. This notion is sometimes put as having foot-in-mouth disease, as in He has a bad case of foot-in-mouth disease, always making some tactless remark. The first expression dates from about 1900. The variant, dating from the mid-1900s, is a play on the foot-and-mouth (sometimes called hoof-and-mouth) disease that afflicts cattle, causing eruptions to break out around the mouth and hoofs.
See also: foot, put

shake off

Free oneself or get rid of something or someone, as in I've had a hard time shaking off this cold, or She forged ahead, shaking off all the other runners. It is also put as give someone the shake, as in We managed to give our pursuers the shake. The first term dates from the late 1300s; the slangy variant dates from the second half of the 1800s.
See also: off, shake
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

the British disease

a problem or failing supposed to be characteristically British, especially (formerly) a proneness to industrial unrest. informal
See also: British, disease
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

shake off

v.
1. To shake something so as to dislodge what is on it: We shook off the picnic blanket to get rid of the grasshoppers. I picked up the beach towel and shook it off.
2. To get rid of something by shaking: The dog climbed out of the creek and shook off the water. I shook the snow off my jacket and hung it up.
3. To free oneself of something; get rid of something: We shook off our fear and proceeded into the dark cave. The injured player shook the pain off and continued to play.
See also: off, shake
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

foot-in-mouth disease

n. the tendency to say the wrong thing at the wrong time. Well, Ralph has foot-in-mouth disease again.
See also: disease

white man’s disease

n. the inability to jump in basketball. You break your leg, Walter? Or you got a case of white man’s disease.
See also: disease, white
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

foot-in-mouth disease

The knack of always saying the wrong thing. The expression is both a verbal play on the foot-and-mouth disease that affects livestock and on the expression “to put one’s foot in one’s mouth,” meaning to make a verbal blunder. The latter dates from the late nineteenth or early twentieth century (see also put one’s foot in it). The current cliché is much newer, dating from the mid-twentieth century.
See also: disease
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in classic literature ?
But when intemperance and disease multiply in a State, halls of justice and medicine are always being opened; and the arts of the doctor and the lawyer give themselves airs, finding how keen is the interest which not only the slaves but the freemen of a city take about them.
By the invention of lingering death; for he had a mortal disease which he perpetually tended, and as recovery was out of the question, he passed his entire life as a valetudinarian; he could do nothing but attend upon himself, and he was in constant torment whenever he departed in anything from his usual regimen, and so dying hard, by the help of science he struggled on to old age.
And if some one prescribes for him a course of dietetics, and tells him that he must swathe and swaddle his head, and all that sort of thing, he replies at once that he has no time to be ill, and that he sees no good in a life which is spent in nursing his disease to the neglect of his customary employment; and therefore bidding good-bye to this sort of physician, he resumes his ordinary habits, and either gets well and lives and does his business, or, if his constitution falls, he dies and has no more trouble.
And therefore our politic Asclepius may be supposed to have exhibited the power of his art only to persons who, being generally of healthy constitution and habits of life, had a definite ailment; such as these he cured by purges and operations, and bade them live as usual, herein consulting the interests of the State; but bodies which disease had penetrated through and through he would not have attempted to cure by gradual processes of evacuation and infusion: he did not want to lengthen out good-for-nothing lives, or to have weak fathers begetting weaker sons;--if a man was not able to live in the ordinary way he had no business to cure him; for such a cure would have been of no use either to himself, or to the State.
Harris said a little something in one's stomach often kept the disease in check; and Mrs.
From 1996 to 2004, some 21% of 10,490 reports of animal diseases from 191 countries submitted to the Program for Monitoring Emerging Diseases (ProMED) concerned humans affected by zoonotic disease (1).
The tau gene, which has been linked to other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, has also been connected to late-onset Parkinson's.
The Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) has a longstanding and substantial interest in research concerning the prevention and treatment of kidney or urologic disorders.
Researchers are uncovering a definite link between environmental pollutants and a growing number of autoimmune diseases. Disorders like lupus, multiple sclerosis (MS) and Type I diabetes are on the rise, says Glinda Cooper, an epidemiologist with the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS).
COCH5B2 is a target antigen of anti-inner ear antibodies in autoimmune inner ear diseases. Otol Neurotol 2001;22:614-18.
In 1986, scientists discovered the disease was a type of spongiform encephalopathy (in-SEH-fuh-LAH-puh-thee), a category of diseases that destroys neurons and leaves small holes in the brain.
IBD is a term that covers a variety of diseases including Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease which effect the gastrointestinal tract.
"The idea that abnormalities of protein folding lead to protein accumulation in the cell and cell death in many diseases is a very important concept," says Jeffrey Cummings, director of the Alzheimer's Center at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA).
For state wildlife biologists, the big concern was game farms bringing in diseases. "Whenever you move an animal," Rowledge says, "you're moving all the diseases and parasites the animal has in it and on it.
An introduction to finding, locating, and assessing periodontal diseases