demand (something) of (someone or something)

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demand (something) of (someone or something)

To insist that someone or something do, provide, or relinquish something. I demand the full attention of my students, so if you plan to nap or socialize in here, then you might as well drop this class right now. You're really demanding a lot of our washer by throwing such a big load in there.
See also: demand, of
References in periodicals archive ?
1 demand of tenants in industrial/industrial parks is beating and air conditioning (59.4%), followed by rent relief (56.3%) and timely and effective communication from their property manager/management firm (53.1%).
The installations followed the recommendations made in Accurate Air's audit report, which showed that a 50-hp compressor could satisfy, the facility's normal demand of 200 scfm.
where [[xi].sub.i] = [dq.sub.i]/dP P/[q.sub.i] is the price elasticity of demand of individual i.
In summary, demand for flexible slabstock foam was the highest of all polyurethane products in 1998, with a total demand of 1,866 million lbs.
The New York State Independent System Operator (ISO) reported in late February that while New York City is expected to meet its supply requirement this summer, the forecasted demand of 11,020 MW is well above the record-setting 10,650 MW during the very hot summer of 2001.
To sum up, while the PPPC forecasts a growth rate for newsprint demand of only 0.2% worldwide for 2000-2003 combined, the good news is that the worst of that predicted difficult period will already have happened by the time this article is published.
Compared to the potential supply of semiconductors, this is clearly an "imbalance." The Fed proposes to redress the imbalance by killing the demand of the entrepreneurial classes.
In the vertically parted mold category the surplus could be fewer than 70,000 tons for a demand of 1.25 million tons, leading to a possible critical shortage of supply in 1998 and '99.
Demand of polybutadiene posted an annual increase of 5% in 1995, but will show average annual growth of through 2000.
Demand of FKM will increase by an average annual rate of 4%, while HNBR is expected to increase annually at a rate of t5% through 2000.
Demand of light weight belting in 1995 is expected to surpass the mark set in 1994 by 4%, with annual long term growth of 3% expected through the year 2000.
Carbon and low-alloy steel showed a decrease in demand of 12.7% for 1991.
Total demand of natural and synthetic rubber is expected to reach 3,159,200 metric tons in 1995, compared to the level of 3,119,300 metric tons posted in 1994.
Demand of dry natural rubber will increase to 932,000 metric tons in 1995, compared to the 929,000 metrics tons posted in 1994.
Total domestic demand of synthetic rubber in 1995 is expected to reach 2,154,200 metric tons, a 1.7% increase over the 2,117,600 metric tons consumed in 1994.