degree

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by degrees

Gradually; in steps. I've been putting $50 aside every month to increase my savings account by degrees.
See also: by, degree

do a 180 degree turn

To make a big change in some area of one's life. If one physically turns 180 degrees, one will then be facing the opposite direction. A: "Can you believe that Sam quit his job at the firm?" B: "No, he really did a 180 degree turn on being a paralegal!"
See also: 180, degree, turn

get the third degree

To be interrogated, scrutinized, or questioned intensely or thoroughly by someone. My boyfriend is so controlling that I always get the third degree if I go anywhere or see anyone without him. I got the third degree from the police regarding my whereabouts during the crime.
See also: degree, get, third

give (someone) the third degree

To interrogate, scrutinize, or question someone intensely or thoroughly. My boyfriend is so controlling, always giving me the third degree if I go anywhere or see anyone without him. The police gave me the third degree regarding my whereabouts during the crime.
See also: degree, give, third

one degree under

Not completely well or healthy. I'm a lot better than I was on Friday, but I'm still feeling one degree under.
See also: degree, one

the third degree

Intense or thorough interrogation, scrutiny, or questioning. Kayla's boyfriend is so controlling, always giving her the third degree if she goes anywhere or sees anyone without him. I got the third degree from the police regarding my whereabouts during the crime.
See also: degree, third

to a certain degree

Somewhat; partly; in a limited way or to a limited extent. Your essay would be improved to a certain degree by tidying up your paragraphs, but your topic on the whole has some fundamental problems. Our administration is willing to negotiate to a certain degree, but we aren't ready to make any significant changes to the legislation.
See also: certain, degree

to a degree

Somewhat; partly; in a limited way or to a limited degree. Your essay would be improved to a degree by tidying up your paragraphs, but your topic on the whole has some fundamental problems. Our administration is willing to negotiate to a degree, but we aren't ready to make any significant changes to the legislation.
See also: degree

to some degree

Somewhat; partly; in a limited way or to a limited extent. Your essay would be improved to some degree by tidying up your paragraphs, but your topic on the whole has some fundamental problems. The administration is willing to negotiate to some degree, but it is not ready to make any significant changes to the legislation.
See also: degree

to the nth degree

To the highest level or degree; as much as possible. We're pushing the computer to the nth degree to be able to render these kinds of effects. The film is cheesy to the nth degree, but intentionally so.
See also: degree, nth

turn 180 degrees

1. Literally, to turn and face the opposite direction. I was going to go to the park, but when I saw those dark clouds roll in, I turned 180 degrees and headed back home.
2. To make a big change in one's position, opinion, lifestyle, etc. A: "Can you believe that Sam quit his job at the firm?" B: "No, he really turned 180 degrees on being a paralegal!"
See also: 180, degree, turn
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

do a one-eighty

 and turn one hundred and eighty degrees 
1. Lit. to turn around and go in the opposite direction. When I hollered, the dog did a one-eighty and headed back to its own yard.
2. Fig. to radically reverse a decision or opinion. His political philosophy turned one hundred and eighty degrees when he grew a little older.

*third degree

Fig. a long and detailed period of questioning. (*Typically: get ~; give someone ~.) Why is it I get the third degree from you every time I come home late? Poor Sally spent all night at the police station getting the third degree.
See also: degree, third

to the nth degree

to the maximum amount. Jane is a perfectionist and tries to be careful to the nth degree. This scientific instrument is accurate to the nth degree.
See also: degree, nth
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

by degrees

Gradually, by successive steps or stages. For example, By degrees he began to delegate more and more of his duties to his staff. [Mid-1500s] Also see by inches.
See also: by, degree

third degree

Intensive questioning or rough treatment used to obtain information or a confession, as in The detectives gave her the third degree, or Jim gave her the third degree when she came home so late. This term comes from freemasonry, where a candidate receives the third or highest degree, that of master mason, upon passing an intensive test. Dating from the 1770s, the phrase was transferred to other kinds of interrogation in the late 1800s.
See also: degree, third

to a degree

Also, to an extent. See to some degree.
See also: degree

to some degree

Also, to a certain degree; to some or a certain extent ; to a degree or an extent . Somewhat, in a way, as in To some degree we'll have to compromise, or To an extent it's a matter of adjusting to the colder climate. The use of degree in these terms, all used in the same way, dates from the first half of the 1700s, and extent from the mid-1800s.
See also: degree

to the nth degree

To the utmost, as in They'd decked out the house to the nth degree. This expression comes from mathematics, where to the nth means "to any required power" ( n standing for any number). It was first recorded in 1852.
See also: degree, nth
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

give someone the third degree

If someone gives you the third degree, they ask you a lot of questions in a determined manner. He told the operator his wife was having a baby on the pavement. The operator gave him the third degree to make sure he was serious. The interviewer didn't exactly give her the third degree.
See also: degree, give, someone, third

to the nth degree

If you do something or have a particular quality to the nth degree, you do it or have it to an extreme degree. He carried discretion to the nth degree, speaking only once about his job. You're a risk-taker to the nth degree.
See also: degree, nth
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

one degree under

slightly unwell. informal
See also: degree, one

to the nth degree

to any extent; to the utmost.
In mathematics, nth denotes an unspecified member of a series of numbers or enumerated items.
1994 i-D Along the way they argue, get harassed by ignorant locals, sing along to their favourite tunes and camp it up to the nth degree.
See also: degree, nth
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

by deˈgrees

little by little; gradually: The country’s economy won’t improve straight away, but will only get better by degrees.
See also: by, degree

to the nth deˈgree

(informal) to the greatest possible amount, level, etc.; very much: This book is boring to the nth degree.
See also: degree, nth

(give somebody) the ˌthird deˈgree

(informal) question somebody for a long time and in a thorough way; use threats or violence to get information from somebody: The soldiers were given the third degree in order to make them reveal the information.Why are you giving me the third degree?This expression comes from Freemasonry (= a secret society). In order to reach the highest level of the organization and become a Third Degree Mason, members are interrogated.
See also: degree, third
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

third degree

n. a session of questioning, usually by the police. Bart got the third degree, but—being the thoroughbred he is—he was a clam. They gave Spike the third degree, but he refused to say anything.
See also: degree, third
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

by degrees

Little by little; gradually.
See also: by, degree

to a degree

To a small extent; in a limited way: doesn't like spicy food, but can eat a little pepper to a degree.
See also: degree
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

six degrees of separation

The idea that everyone on earth may be linked to anyone else through a chain of connections. This newer phrase for it’s a small world was the title of a play and the movie based on it (1993) by John Guare. The term is becoming a cliché.
See also: degree, of, six

third degree, to give/get the

To give or be subjected to intensive questioning and/or rough treatment. In Freemasonry, the third and highest degree is that of master mason, attained after a stiff examination, and several writers speculate that this may be the source of the late nineteenth-century expression for an inquisition. Today the term is used both for the sometimes brutal tactics of the police and other authorities to make a prisoner tell the truth or reveal secrets, and more lightly for questioning about less important matters, as in “Jane gave Martha the third degree about her good-looking new boss.”
See also: get, give, third

to the nth degree

To the utmost possible. In mathematics to the nth has meant “to any required power” since the eighteenth century, and it soon came to be used figuratively as meaning “to any extent” or “to the utmost.” Thus Francis E. Smedley wrote (Lewis Arundel, 1852), “Minerva was great . . . starched to the nth.”
See also: degree, nth
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa), the previous highest heat index recorded this year was 51.7 degrees in Dagupan City in Pangasinan last April 9.
[delta], [rho], and [sigma] are measured in degrees, while [[absolute value of (M)].sub.ee] and [m.sub.0] are in eV units.
It drops from 9.8 percent to 7.7 percent of all 18- to 24-year-olds, If we also assume that all misclassified GED recipients were counted as having regular high-school degrees, the adjusted graduation rate, excluding GED recipients, actually rises from 1990 to 1999, from 76 percent to 78 percent.
Childress is one of a growing number of physician executives who have earned master's degrees and one of only a handful who have earned a double master's.
Many research libraries employ specialized individuals with advanced training and graduate degrees for a variety of tasks.
The heat index in Guiuan, Eastern Samar soared to 50.8 degrees Celcius on Thursday, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) said.
Try gauging Saturn's diminishing brightness compared to 3.5-magnitude Epsilon ([epsilon]) Tauri just south of the Moon and 0.8-magnitude Aldebaran a few degrees away.
In a 1986 survey of a sample of this group,[2] 12.7 percent reported having a management master's degree, but 9.8 percent were MPH degrees received an average of 17 years previously.
LATITUDE: Lines of latitude measure distance in degrees ([degrees]) north and south of the equator, an imaginary line that circles the globe halfway between the North and South poles (see Globe A).
Howkins' ascent went smoothly until she reached the base of a massive couloir (deep, icy gorge) angling upward at 70 degrees. She sensed immediate danger: snow and ice piled on slopes steeper than 22 degrees spell prime avalanche terrain.
Latitude: measures distance in degrees ([degrees]) north and south of the equator, an imaginary line that circles the globe halfway between the North and South poles (see Globe A).
Latitude: Lines of latitude measure distance in degrees ([degrees]) north and south of the equator, an imaginary line that circles the globe exactly halfway between the North and South poles (see top globe).
(Latitude is always given first, then longitude.) Both latitude and longitude are measured in degrees.
Born in NablusC[degrees], C1/4PalestineC[degrees], C1/4Khelil obtained her doctorate degree in nuclear physics from the State University of North TexasC[degrees], C1/4DentonC[degrees], C1/4where she was the first woman to get such a degreeC[degrees].C1/4
ASSE 1016 recognizes three basic types of bath and shower valves (figure 3): those that compensate for pressure changes only, known as Type P; those that compensate for temperature changes and, to a lesser degree, pressure fluctuations (Type T); and those known as "combination valves," or Type T/P, a hybrid of both pressure-balancing and thermostatic performance regulatory mechanisms.