customer

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cool customer

Someone who remains even-tempered, especially in stressful situations. Brad is such a cool customer. Nothing ever seems to bother him.
See also: cool, customer

an awkward customer

A troublesome person. I don't want Joe to join the club, he's just such an awkward customer.
See also: awkward, customer

the customer is always right

A phrase commonly used in the service industry as a reminder to respect the customer's wishes (and therefore please them). Well, the customer is always right, so if she thinks that her meal is undercooked, make her something else.
See also: always, customer, right

customer is always right

Prov. In order to keep customers happy, the people who serve them should always obey their wishes. (Often cited as a principle of good business dealings; customers sometimes say it to the people serving them in order to try to get good service.) When I began working at the gift shop, my boss told me, "Remember, the customer is always right, no matter how stupid or rude you may think he is being."
See also: always, customer, right

one to a customer

Fig. each person can have or receive only one. (As in sales restrictions where each customer is permitted to buy only one.) "Only one to a customer!" said the chef as he handed out the hamburgers. Is it one to a customer, or can I take two now?
See also: customer, one

slippery customer

 
1. Fig. a clever and deceitful customer. Watch out for that guy with the big padded coat. He may snatch something. He's a real slippery customer.
2. Fig. a slippery creature. This little fish is a slippery customer. Get me something to scoop it back into its bowl.
See also: customer, slippery

tough customer someone

who is difficult to deal with. Some of those bikers are really tough customers. Walt is a tough customer. Just keep away from him.
See also: customer, tough

ugly customer

An ill-natured or vicious individual, as in Watch out for Charlie when he's drinking; he can be an ugly customer. This phrase uses ugly in the sense of "mean" or "dangerous." [c. 1800]
See also: customer, ugly

tough customer

n. someone who is difficult to deal with. Bruno is a tough customer. Just keep away from him.
See also: customer, tough
References in classic literature ?
Now the meaning of "credit" is this--when a customer buys a bar of soap, instead of the customer pulling out a purse and paying for it--she says she will pay another time.
Bobbinet, when his customers were properly out of hearing, "that THESE young ladies should let such an article slip through their fingers.
Unfortunately, everything had included the customers.
Percerin's doors were closed, while a servant, standing before them, was explaining to the illustrious customers of the illustrious tailor that just then M.
Moses Gluckstein, a city gent and very pleasant and fond of sparrowgrass and chokes, and 'e cut in-- there 'adn't been no customers for days--and began to talk very fast, offerin' me for anything I 'ad, anything, petaties or anything, its weight in gold.
At the same time he was Ikey's friend and customer, and often dropped in at the Blue Light Drug Store to have a bruise painted with iodine or get a cut rubber-plastered after a pleasant evening spent along the Bowery.
These customers were either very young men, who hung about the window for a time before slipping in suddenly; or men of a more mature age, but looking generally as if they were not in funds.
The matter-of-fact and doubtful folks, of whom there were a few among the Maypole customers, as unluckily there always are in every little community, were inclined to look upon this tradition as rather apocryphal; but, whenever the landlord of that ancient hostelry appealed to the mounting block itself as evidence, and triumphantly pointed out that there it stood in the same place to that very day, the doubters never failed to be put down by a large majority, and all true believers exulted as in a victory.
The available space in it was not much larger than a hackney-coach; but no one could have wished the bar bigger, that space was so girt in by corpulent little casks, and by cordial-bottles radiant with fictitious grapes in bunches, and by lemons in nets, and by biscuits in baskets, and by the polite beer-pulls that made low bows when customers were served with beer, and by the cheese in a snug corner, and by the landlady's own small table in a snugger corner near the fire, with the cloth everlastingly laid.
It is true, she was looking very charming herself, and Stephen was paying her the utmost attention on this public occasion; jealously buying up the articles he had seen under her fingers in the process of making, and gayly helping her to cajole the male customers into the purchase of the most effeminate futilities.
The customer had desired to purchase an alarm clock, and the boss had shown him two exactly similar, telling him that the price of one was a dollar and of the other a dollar seventy-five.
The driver, on the other hand, was pleased to drop again upon so liberal a fare; and as he was a man - the reader must already have perceived - of easy, not to say familiar, manners, he dropped at once into a vein of friendly talk, commenting on the weather, on the sacred season, which struck him chiefly in the light of a day of liberal gratuities, on the chance which had reunited him to a pleasing customer, and on the fact that John had been (as he was pleased to call it) visibly 'on the randan' the night before.
Noon never passed without my bringing home a customer to the house of my employers, Messrs.
The same day a customer came in, and the shoes suited him so well that he willingly paid a price higher than usual for them; and the poor shoemaker, with the money, bought leather enough to make two pairs more.
He had received a letter, in which a customer had complained that the butter had a twang.