current

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against the current

In contradiction to what is popular or expected. It was difficult to go against the current, but, in the end, I was able to get the team to agree that my proposal is a good idea.
See also: current

pass current

1. obsolete Of a coin, to have a particular monetary worth. The coin passed current for 21 shillings until the end of the 17th century.
2. dated To be considered genuine or authentic. What passes current as orthodox religious belief these days would be considered quite liberal—downright blasphemous, even—200 years ago.
See also: current, pass

swim against the current

To go against or disagree with a prevailing or popularly held opinion or perspective; to act or behave contrary to the majority of others. I really swam against the current when I was in college, but as I've grown older I've found myself falling more in line with other people's way of thinking. I don't understand why you always have to swim against the current instead of making things a little easier on yourself!
See also: current, swim

swim against the tide

To go against or disagree with a prevailing or popularly held opinion or perspective; to act or behave contrary to the majority of others. I really swam against the tide when I was in college with some radical opinions, but as I've grown older I've found myself falling more in line with other people's way of thinking. I don't understand why you always have to swim against the tide instead of making things a little easier on yourself!
See also: swim, tide

swim with the current

To go along or agree with the prevailing or popularly held opinion or perspective; to act or behave the same way as the majority of others. When I was in college, I used to have a lot of radical opinions and beliefs, but as I've grown older, I find myself swimming with the current more often. I'm sorry, but I simply refuse to swim along with the current just because it's the easier option!
See also: current, swim
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

swim against the tide

 and swim against the current 
1. Lit. to swim in a direction opposite to the flow of the water. She became exhausted, swimming against the tide. If you really want strenuous exercise, go out in the stream and swim against the current.
2. Fig. to do something that is in opposition to the general movement of things. Why can't you cooperate? Do you always have to swim against the tide? You always seem to waste your energy swimming against the current.
See also: swim, tide
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

swim against the current

Also, swim against the stream or tide . Go against prevailing opinion or thought, as in I'm voting for him even if that is swimming against the current. Shakespeare used a similar metaphor in 2 Henry IV (5:2): "You must now speak Sir John Falstaff fair, which swims against your stream." For the antonym, see swim with the tide.
See also: current, swim
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

swim against the tide

If you swim against the tide, you do or say the opposite of what most other people are doing or saying. Sinclair seems to be swimming against the tide by not retiring at 60. Thank you for having the courage to swim against the tide and stand up for the qualities that built this great country. Note: You can also say that someone swims with the tide to mean that they act in the same way as most other people. Many great cathedrals are attempting to swim with the tide and bring in tourists to replace the worshippers who no longer come.
See also: swim, tide
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

pass current

be generally accepted as true or genuine. British
Pass current originally referred to the currency of a genuine coin, as opposed to a counterfeit one.
See also: current, pass
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in classic literature ?
The wind freshened, and the Pyrenees, despite the foulness of her bottom, won half a dozen miles away from the westerly current. At daylight, with Pitcairn three miles to windward, Captain Davenport made out two canoes coming off to him.
This bit of a blow kicked that westerly current ahead faster than you imagine."
Once more the trick river reversed its current, but this time the Scarecrow was on guard and used the pole to push the raft toward a big rock which lay in the water.
After passing the wall of water the current did not change or flow backward any more but continued to sweep them steadily forward.
This eddy carried me about a league on my way back again, directly towards the island, but about two leagues more to the northward than the current which carried me away at first; so that when I came near the island, I found myself open to the northern shore of it, that is to say, the other end of the island, opposite to that which I went out from.
When I had made something more than a league of way by the help of this current or eddy, I found it was spent, and served me no further.
The boat was soon in the current of the river again, and soon they would be at Tofton.
A large company in a boat that was working its way along under the Tofton houses observed their danger, and shouted, "Get out of the current!"
Heroically she clung to the heavy iron links, almost dragged from the canoe by the strain of the current upon her craft.
I could not imagine what might cause this strong lateral flow, for the main channel of the river was plainly visible to me from where I sat, and I could see the rippling junction of it and the mysterious current which had aroused my curiosity.
The current was about four miles an hour, with occasional rapids; some of them dangerous, but the voyagers passed them all without accident.
All day the voyagers pulled gently along, and landed in the evening and supped; then re-embarking, they suffered the canoe to float down with the current; taking turns to watch and sleep.
The current continued to be strong; but it was steady, and though they met with frequent rapids, none of them were bad.
Crooks and one of his companions were thrown amidst roaring breakers and a whirling current, but succeeded, by strong swimming, to reach the shore.
The current swept me out into the mid-stream, and greatly increased the speed at which I swam.