croaker

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croaker

slang A doctor. Hey, you're not sounding so good—maybe you should go to the croaker
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

croaker

n. a doctor. The croaker said my tonsils have to come out.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The prior r or [r.sub.0]~U(0.01,1.5) has been tested on Whitemouth Croaker (Micropogonias furnieri) exploited in southern Brazil (Vasconcellos and Haimovici, 2006) and spans the range of possible r values for marine fish populations (Jensen et al., 2012).
It will be interesting to see what the croaker run is going to look like this year.
Only whitemouth croakers over two years old were included in the growth analysis because young-of-the-year and one year old individuals that grew in the Patos Lagoon can have multiple thin opaque checks in their otoliths that can be wrongly considered as annuli (Cavole & Haimovici, 2015) and affect growth estimates.
Initially restricted to coastal areas and continental shelf fishing grounds, bottom gillnet fisheries developed in southeastern and southern (SE/S) Brazil focusing primarily on demersal fishes as angel sharks (Squatina spp.), whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri), and Argentine croaker (Umbrina conosai) (Klippel et al, 2005).
Physiological performance of young-of-the-year Atlantic croakers from different Atlantic coast estuaries: implications for stock structure.
Such investigation includes the effects of long-term exploitation of demersal's fish populations off the coast of Sierra Leone, West Africa by Coutin and Payne [5]; the growth, maturity and mortality of the sciaenidae of the tropical West Africa and those on biological data of West African croakers carried out by Longhurst [6,7].
Overall, copepods (PRIV= 23.1%), detritus (PRIV= 20.4%), chironomid larvae (PRIV= 18.3%), amphipods (PRIV= 13.4%), shrimps (PRIV= 8.5% consisting of approximately equal amounts of palaemonids and penaeids), polychaetes (PRIV= 8.4%), and fish (PRIV= 3.35%) were the principal food items consumed by croakers (Table 1).
Croakers are a "pretty typical Gulf fish," says Prosanta Chakrabarty, a fish biologist at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge.
According to the interviewees, the white shrimp (camarao-branco) Litopenaeus schimitti Burkenroad, 1938, the croaker (corvina) Micropogonias furnieri (Desmares, 1823), the catfish (bagre) (family Ariidae) and the largehead hairtail (espada) Trichiurus lepturus Linnaeus, 1758, in spite of presenting larger capture in some months, are caught every month, while the mullet (tainha) (Mugil spp.), the codling (abrotea) Urophycis brasiliensis (Kaup, 1858) and U.
Now that you know some classic Croakers, match each statement in the left-hand column with the appropriate verb in the right-hand column.
Abstract.--Yellowfin croaker (Umbrina roncador) and spotfin croaker (Roncador stearnsii) were collected from San Clemente, California from May through September 2006.
Shutting down reproduction is probably a survival strategy that croakers developed to cope with brief periods of hypoxia, Thomas says.
He also reports frogs back in his garden pond on February 11, where last year there were more than 45 croakers. Glynn Oakes has had them in his Mossley Hill pond for the last three weeks.
It wasn't 20 minutes before we began encountering croakers feeding on a slight contour break in 4 feet of water, and I drilled a pair of unsuspecting fish as they munched on crayfish in the crystalline water.
For the Asian market, meanwhile, it is already producing whole frozen croakers in a whole round form.