crime

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Related to Crimes: grimes

it's no crime to (do something)

It is no great offense to do something; it is not wrong, unlawful, or immoral to do something. I wouldn't worry about quitting your job. After all, it's no crime to want a career you love! I know you feel guilty about breaking up with Steve, but it's no crime to fall out of love with someone.
See also: crime, no

if you can't do the time, don't do the crime

Do not misbehave if you are unprepared or unwilling to accept the punishment. A: "Dad, I can't be grounded for a month, I need to see my friends!" B: "Yeah, well, you're the one who keeps breaking curfew. If you can't do the time, don't do the crime!"
See also: crime, if

crime doesn't pay

Ultimately, crime does not benefit the criminal, and only results in negative consequences. The billboards are designed as reminders that even minor fraud convictions carry serious consequences—crime doesn't pay.
See also: crime, pay

partner in crime

1. One who aids or accompanies someone in crimes or nefarious actions. Once the CFO and CEO were revealed to be partners in crime, they were both fired for their involvement in the embezzling scandal.
2. By extension, one's close friend or confidant. If Seth is here, Jimmy can't be far behind—those two are partners in crime.
See also: crime, partner

the weed of crime bears bitter fruit

Illegal, immoral, or illicit schemes will only every yield bad outcomes. While sentencing the three CEOs following their conviction, the judge said he wanted to make it clear to the whole country that the weed of crime bears bitter fruits.
See also: bear, bitter, crime, fruit, of, weed

Crime doesn't pay.

Prov. Crime will ultimately not benefit a person. No matter how tempting it may appear, crime doesn't pay.
See also: crime, pay

partners in crime

 
1. Fig. persons who cooperate in committing a crime or a deception. (Usually an exaggeration.) The sales manager and the used-car salesmen are nothing but partners in crime.
2. persons who cooperate in some legal task. The legal department and payroll are partners in crime as far as the average worker is concerned.
See also: crime, partner

Poverty is not a crime.

 and Poverty is no sin.
Prov. You should not condemn someone for being poor. Ellen: I wish there were a law to make all those poor people move out of our neighborhood. Jim: Poverty is not a crime, Ellen.
See also: crime, not, poverty

crime does not pay

Lawbreakers do not benefit from their actions. For example, Steve didn't think it mattered that he stole a candy bar, but he's learned the hard way that crime does not pay . This maxim, originating as a slogan of the F.B.I. and given wide currency by the cartoon character Dick Tracy, was first recorded in 1927. There have been numerous jocular plays on it, as in Woody Allen's screenplay for Take the Money and Run (1969): "I think crime pays. The hours are good, you travel a lot."
See also: crime, does, not, pay

someone's partner in crime

Someone's partner in crime is a person that they do something with. My evening begins with watching possibly the worst romance I've ever seen, with my movie partner in crime, Monique. He presented his last programme with partner in crime Will Anderson last Friday. Note: This expression is often used humorously.
See also: crime, partner

the weed of crime bears bitter fruit

No good will come from criminal schemes. The Shadow was a very popular radio detective series that began in the early 1930s. Its hero, playboy Lamont Cranston, had “the power to cloud men's minds,” a form of hypnosis by which he appeared off to the side of where people thought he stood (contrary to popular belief, the Shadow did not make himself invisible). After the credits at the end of every episode, the Shadow intoned, “The weed of crime bears bitter fruit. Crime does not pay! The Shadow knows,” and then utter a sardonic laugh. Another famous Shadow-ism was “Who knows what evil lurks in the minds of men?—The Shadow knows!”
See also: bear, bitter, crime, fruit, of, weed
References in periodicals archive ?
5 percent of youth and 5 percent of minors' convictions and sex crimes followed with 5.
The Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 1998 would expand that law to include crimes based on bias against someone because of gender, sexual orientation or a disability, and eliminate the six federally protected activities as limiting factors.
Expert estimates of crimes committed by drug addicts range from 89 to 191 a year.
Sheridan's Clark Wade estimates that perhaps as many as 70 percent of the men in Sheridan were convicted of drug possession offenses or crimes committed to support their drug habits.
Clinton used the occasion to endorse the Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 1997.
Another 62 men and 32 women had lived in institutions for the mentally retarded for much of their lives; they did not commit enough crimes to merit inclusion in the data analysis.
This fear is one of the reasons why hate crimes are underreported, says Veronica Robertson, who represents the disability community on the Illinois Hate Crimes Task Force.
His main research interests include; Far-right wing culture, deviance, political crime & terrorism; criminological theory; and International & comparative criminal justice.
City officials said Wednesday that domestic-abuse cases are reported as serious crimes only if there are visible injuries or police believe felony charges should be filed.
Crime Mapping: New Tools for Law Enforcement, Irvin B.
Hate crimes motivated by the offender's bias toward a particular ethnicity/national origin were directed at 1,228 victims.
Until data users examine all the variables that affect crime in a town, city, county, state, region, or college or university, they can make no meaningful comparisons.
For the gun control hypothesis to be correct we must assume that guns deter certain types of crimes but not others.
They claim that the said requirements for personality development can only be provided by the father, and they view the black single-female-headed household as a major cause of America's high crime rates.
Following a faulty start on Tuesday, when the website failed to cope with up to 300,000 hits per minute, residents can now enter their postcode or street name to discover the number of crimes reported in individual streets during December 2010.