creature

(redirected from Creatures)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms.
Related to Creatures: Mythical creatures
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

(someone's or something's) time has come

1. A person or animal has reached the end of their life. Don't grieve, son. I've lived a long and fulfilling life, and now my time has come. She was an old dog, Sarah. Her time had come.
2. Some piece of equipment or technology has reached the end of its usefulness or functionality. Well, this old laptop did a great job for me all through high school and college, but I think its time has come now. A: "This damned printer is on the fritz again." B: "Yeah, I told the boss that its time has come, but she doesn't want to shell out the cash for a new one."
See also: come, time

crawl with (someone or something)

To be filled or covered with people or things in motion. Ugh, the mall is crawling with teenagers tonight—let's get out of here. We took off running when we realized that the tree stump was crawling with bugs.
See also: crawl

creature comforts

Things that one needs in order to feel happy and comfortable. I have a hard time abandoning my creature comforts to go hiking and camping. At a minimum, I need running water!
See also: comfort, creature

creature feature

A horror film in which the central focus is on one or more monsters. I miss the creature features of the '50s and '60s—they were so campy and fun, unlike the dull CGI films of today.
See also: creature, feature

creature of habit

One who prefers the comfort and reliability of routine and habitual behavior. My brother is far too much a creature of habit to be up for something like backpacking across Europe. I know we're told to shuck our routines and live spontaneously, but I'm a creature of habit—it's just easier when you know exactly how each day will pan out.
See also: creature, habit, of

inject (someone or something) with (something)

To squeeze or squirt a fluid into someone or something by using a needle, syringe, or similar tool. We watched helplessly as the doctors injected the patient with epinephrine. You can clean the surgical area by injecting it with saline solution.
See also: inject

leave (someone or something) be

To not interact with, interfere with, or bother someone or something. Come on, she didn't do anything to you. Leave her be. At a certain point, you have to just leave the painting be instead of continuing to make changes to it. I know you're trying to help, but I'd really rather you just leave my team be right now so we can focus on our work.
See also: leave

let alone

1. verb To stop bothering someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "alone." Why do you keep picking at that scab on your knee? Let it alone already! For the last time, let your brother alone—he needs to study!
2. expression Not to mention. The phrase is used to emphasize that if other more significant or pressing things are not possible or cannot be accommodated, a lesser thing certainly is not or cannot either. I hardly had time to brush my teeth this morning, let alone do my hair! We can't afford a vacation, let alone a trip to Disney World.
See also: alone, let

let it/(one) be

To not interact with or bother someone or interfere with something; to leave someone or something alone. I know you want to help, but he needs some space right now. Just let him be. I was going to try to fix the printer but I figured I would just let it be until you got here.
See also: let

out in the cold

Ignored, forgotten, or excluded, as from a group, activity, benefit, etc. You have to make sure you stand out in a company, or you might be left in the cold when it comes time to hand out promotions. Our constituency feels it has really been kept out in the cold during the debate around this topic. I felt a bit out in the cold at Janet's party last night.
See also: cold, out

put (someone or something) out of its/(one's) misery

1. To kill someone or something as a means to ending suffering. Considering the dog's extensive wounds, the vet encouraged us to put him out of his misery.
2. To quell one's curiosity. Oh, just put me out of my misery and tell me how the movie ends!
See also: misery, of, out, put

crawling with some kind of creature

[of a surface] covered with insects or animals, moving about. The basement was crawling with rats! We came home and found the kitchen floor crawling with ants.
See also: crawl, creature, kind, of

creature comforts

things that make people comfortable. The hotel room was a bit small, but all the creature comforts were there.
See also: comfort, creature

inject (something) into (someone, something, or some creature)

 and inject (someone, something, or some creature) with (something)
to give a hypodermic injection of something to someone or an animal. The nurse injected the medicine into my arm. He injected a very large dose into the patient.
See also: inject

inject something into something

 
1. Lit. to squirt something, such as oil, water, etc., into something. The pump injected the oil into the wheel bearings when I squeezed the lever. The mechanic injected a solvent into the lock.
2. Fig. to put something, such as humor, excitement, etc., into a situation. Let's inject a little humor into this dismal affair. She likes to inject a lot of excitement into her books.
See also: inject

leave (someone, something, or some creature) alone

 and let (someone, something, or some creature) alone; leave (someone, something, or some creature) be; let (someone, something, or some creature) be
to stop bothering someone or something. Don't torment the cat. Leave it alone. I don't want your help. Let me alone. Don't argue about it. Let it be!
See also: alone, leave

let alone someone or something

not to mention or think of someone or something; not even to take someone or something into account. (Fixed order.) Do I have a dollar? I don't even have a dime, let alone a dollar. I didn't invite John, let alone the rest of his family.
See also: alone, let

let someone or something alone

 and leave someone or something alone; leave someone or something be
to avoid touching, bothering, or communicating with someone or something. Leave me alone. I don't want your help. Let it alone! Don't touch it! It may be hot!
See also: alone, let

*out in the cold

 
1. Lit. outdoors where it is cold. (*Typically: be ~; keep someone or some creature ~; leave someone or some creature ~; put someone or some creature ~.) Open the door! Let me in! Don't keep me out in the cold! Who left the dog out in the cold all night?
2. Fig. not informed about what is happening or has happened. (*Typically: be ~; keep someone ~; leave someone ~.) Don't keep your supervisor out in the cold. Tell her what's going on. Please don't leave me out in the cold. Share the news with me!
3. Fig. excluded. (*Typically: be ~; keep someone ~; leave someone ~.) There was a party last night, but my friends left me out in the cold. When it came to the final prizes in the dog show, they left our animals out in the cold.
See also: cold, out

put some creature out of its misery

to kill an animal in a humane manner. (See also put one out of one's misery.) The vet put that dog with cancer out of its misery. Please, put my sick goldfish out of its misery.
See also: creature, misery, of, out, put

someone's time has come

 and some creature's time has come
Euph. someone or some creature is about to die. The poor old dog's time has come. My time has come. I'm ready to go.
See also: come, time

creature comfort

Something that contributes to physical comfort, such as food, clothing, or housing. For example, Dean always stayed in the best hotels; he valued his creature comforts. This idiom was first recorded in 1659.
See also: comfort, creature

let alone

2. Not to mention, as in We have no room for another house guest, let alone an entire family. [c. 1800]
See also: alone, let

out in the cold

Excluded from benefits given to others, neglected, as in Her stand on abortion left her out in the cold with the party. This idiom alludes to being left outdoors without shelter. [Mid-1800s] Also see come in from the cold.
See also: cold, out

creature comforts

Creature comforts are all the modern sleeping, eating, and washing facilities that make life easy and pleasant. Each room has its own patio or balcony and provides guests with all modern creature comforts. I'm not a camper — I like my creature comforts too much. Note: An old meaning of `creatures' is material comforts, or things that make you feel comfortable.
See also: comfort, creature

creature of habit

a person who follows an unvarying routine.
See also: creature, habit, of

let aˈlone

used after a statement to emphasize that because the first thing is not true or possible, the next thing cannot be true or possible either: I wouldn’t speak to him, let alone trust him or lend him money.She didn’t even apologize, let alone offer to pay for the damage.
See also: alone, let

a creature of ˈhabit

a person who always does certain things at certain times: My grandfather is a real creature of habit — he likes his meals at the same time every day.
See also: creature, habit, of

out in the cold

Lacking benefits given to others; neglected.
See also: cold, out

let alone

Not to mention; much less: "Their ancestors had been dirt poor and never saw royalty, let alone hung around with them" (Garrison Keillor).
See also: alone, let

creature comforts

Life’s material amenities. The term dates from the seventeenth century; it appears in Thomas Brooks’s Collected Works (1670), and again in Matthew Henry’s 1710 Commentaries on the Psalms (“They have . . . the sweetest relish of their creature comforts”).
See also: comfort, creature
References in classic literature ?
As Bradley gazed upon them in wide-eyed astonishment, he saw plainly that all his intelligence, all his acquired knowledge through years of observation and experience were set at naught by the simple evidence of the fact that stood out glaringly before his eyes--the creatures' wings were not mechanical devices but as natural appendages, growing from their shoulderblades, as were their arms and legs.
Happening just then to feel the Love Magnet in his pocket, he said to the creatures, with more confidence:
I wonder what the creatures intend doing with us, Perry.
The little sloth-like creature was standing and staring at me.
It is true that these monstrous creatures which we had seen were lumbering, inoffensive brutes which were unlikely to hurt anyone, but in this world of wonders what other survivals might there not be--what fierce, active horrors ready to pounce upon us from their lair among the rocks or brushwood?
As to those, they are cruel, mischievous creatures; they would be right in exterminating them."
At first Tara of Helium had hoped that she might dodge him, for she could not but guess that she was not only more fleet but infinitely more agile than these strange creatures; but soon there came to her the realization that in the time consumed in an attempt to elude his grasp his nearer fellows would be upon her and escape then impossible, so she chose instead to charge straight for him, and when he guessed her decision he stood, half crouching and with outstretched arms, awaiting her.
I tell you the workshop was opened, and the inner campong as well by some one who knew the value of money and wanted that chest, but why they should have released the creatures from the inner enclosure is beyond me."
"Each of their arms is a wooden club," answered the little man, "and I'm sure the creatures mean mischief, by the looks of their eyes.
Will no entreaties cause thee to turn a favourable eye upon thy creature, who implores thy goodness and compassion?
The death agonies of a fellow being are, to these strange creatures provocative of the wildest hilarity, while their chief form of commonest amusement is to inflict death on their prisoners of war in various ingenious and horrible ways.
"You have often driven that pony up to my place," said master; "it only shows the creature's memory and intelligence; how did he know that you were not going there again?
When they reached the village, the Hazel-nut child left off pricking the horse, and the poor tired creature pursued its way at a snail's pace.
And Lizaveta Petrovna, with one hand supporting the wobbling head, lifted up on the other arm the strange, limp, red creature, whose head was lost in its swaddling clothes.
"Behold yon miserable creature. That Point is a Being like ourselves, but confined to the non-dimensional Gulf.