cousin

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country cousin

Someone unknowledgeable, unsophisticated, or naïve about the niceties and complexities of an urban environment, especially in a humorous or quaint capacity. I always try to lend a hand to the poor country cousins who invariably stand bewildered by the skyscrapers and the incredible noise of traffic. I thought I was savvy enough to live in New York City, but I soon felt like the country cousin.
See also: country, cousin

everybody and his cousin

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his cousin is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, cousin, everybody

everyone and his cousin

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everyone and his cousin is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, cousin, everyone

first cousin

Someone or something that bears a close relation or resemblance to another person or thing. Their newest model of car, though spiffed up, remains a first cousin to their last design. In terms of artistic vision, the young director is clearly a first cousin to the likes of Alfred Hitchcock.
See also: cousin, first

kissing cousin

1. Any cousin who is not a first cousin. Brad and Tom look a lot alike, but they are not that closely related—they're kissing cousins.
2. A friend or relative who is close enough to be greeted with a kiss. Lisa and Kelly have been such close friends for so long that they're kissing cousins.
See also: cousin, kiss

second cousin

Slightly similar or related to something else, while being noticeably different or unique. Usually followed by "to" or "of (something)." It's clear that, from design, power, and aesthetic, their new sports car is second cousin to the classic muscle cars of the 1950s.
See also: cousin, second

kissing cousins

relatives who know one another well enough to kiss when they meet. Joe and I are kissing cousins, though we ain't seen one another since we was kids. Technically, we're second cousins once removed, but I just say we're kissing cousins.
See also: cousin, kiss

think someone hung the moon (and stars)

 and think someone is God's own cousin
Rur. to think someone is perfect. Joe won't listen to any complaints about Mary. He thinks she hung the moon and stars. Jim is awful stuck-up. He thinks he's God's own cousin.
See also: hung, moon, think

What's buzzin'?

 and What's buzzin' cousin?
Sl. What's happening? Hey, chum! What's buzzin' cousin? What's buzzin' around here?

country cousin

One whose lack of sophistication or rural ways may amuse or embarrass city dwellers. For example, The sightseeing guide geared his tour toward country cousins who had never been to a large city before . This term, which literally means "a cousin who lives in the country," has been used in this figurative way since the second half of the 1700s, although the idea is much older (such persons were stock figures of fun in Restoration comedies of the late 1600s and early 1700s).
See also: country, cousin

first cousin

A close relation or resemblance to someone or something, as in This new machine is a first cousin to the previous model. The figurative use of cousin, which literally means "the child of one's aunt or uncle," dates from the 1300s.
See also: cousin, first

kissing cousins

Two or more things that are closely akin or very similar. For example, They may be made by different manufacturers, but these two cars are kissing cousins. This metaphoric term alludes to a distant relative who is well known enough to be greeted with a kiss. [c. 1930]
See also: cousin, kiss

second cousin

Something that is related or similar but not quite the same, as in This beef stew is second cousin to boeuf bourguignon. This expression transfers the literal sense of second cousin-that is, the child of the first cousin of one's mother or father-a usage dating from the mid-1600s.
See also: cousin, second

a country ˈbumpkin/ˈcousin

(informal, usually disapproving) a person from the countryside who is not used to towns or cities and seems stupid: He felt a real country bumpkin, sitting in that expensive restaurant, not knowing which cutlery to use.
See also: bumpkin, country, cousin

What’s buzzin’ (cousin)?

interrog. What’s happening? Hey, chum! What’s buzzin’ cousin?
References in classic literature ?
Fanny, with all her faults of ignorance and timidity, was fixed at Mansfield Park, and learning to transfer in its favour much of her attachment to her former home, grew up there not unhappily among her cousins.
The young people were all at home, and sustained their share in the introduction very well, with much good humour, and no embarrassment, at least on the part of the sons, who, at seventeen and sixteen, and tall of their age, had all the grandeur of men in the eyes of their little cousin.
The rest of the cousins are ladies and gentlemen of various ages and capacities, the major part amiable and sensible and likely to have done well enough in life if they could have overcome their cousinship; as it is, they are almost all a little worsted by it, and lounge in purposeless and listless paths, and seem to be quite as much at a loss how to dispose of themselves as anybody else can be how to dispose of them.
The cousins, even those older cousins who were paralysed when Sir Leicester married her, do her feudal homage; and the Honourable Bob Stables daily repeats to some chosen person between breakfast and lunch his favourite original remark, that she is the best-groomed woman in the whole stud.
The mist hid me, and the carriage, no doubt full of cousins, drove on in the direction of the house; but what an absurd position I was in
Pardon me, dear cousin, you are unjust in your own claims.
Coquenard was not less affected by it on her part, for she added, "My cousin will not return if he finds that we do not treat him kindly; but otherwise he has so little time to pass in Paris, and consequently to spare to us, that we must entreat him to give us every instant he can call his own previous to his departure.
The sheriff had now touched his cousin in a sensitive spot; and Marmaduke lent a more attentive ear to the speaker, who, after waiting a moment to see the effect of this extraordinary development, proceeded:
Oh, Dan, Cousin Mattie and her sisters-in-law are just as nice and kind as they can be," reproached Cecily.
The alarming intelligence was no sooner communicated by the bony apprentice with the thin legs, than the girls tripped upstairs to Maria Lobbs's bedroom, and the male cousin and Nathaniel Pipkin were thrust into a couple of closets in the sitting-room, for want of any better places of concealment; and when Maria Lobbs and the wicked little cousin had stowed them away, and put the room to rights, they opened the street door to old Lobbs, who had never left off knocking since he first began.
On coming within sight of it the cousin, Sancho, and Don Quixote dismounted, and the first two immediately tied the latter very firmly with the ropes, and as they were girding and swathing him Sancho said to him, "Mind what you are about, master mine; don't go burying yourself alive, or putting yourself where you'll be like a bottle put to cool in a well; it's no affair or business of your worship's to become the explorer of this, which must be worse than a Moorish dungeon.
No; but you DID ask the Wellands to announce your engagement sooner so that we might all back her up; and if it hadn't been for that cousin Louisa would never have invited her to the dinner for the Duke.
Perhaps your cousin Laurence would like to hear them too.
I did not know that my cousin Hepzibah's garden was under another person's care.
Captain Bonneville and his companions had pursued their journey a considerable distance down the course of Snake River, when the old chief halted on the bank, and dismounting, recommended that they should turn their horses loose to graze, while he summoned a cousin of his from a group of lodges on the opposite side of the stream.