cook the books

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cook the books

To falsify financial records for a company or organization. My partner had been cooking the books for years, but because I was the CEO, I got the blame for our company's collapse.
See also: book, cook

cook the books

Falsify a company's financial records, as in An independent audit showed that they've been cooking the books for years. This slangy phrase was first recorded in 1636.
See also: book, cook

cook the books

1. If someone cooks the books, they dishonestly change the figures in their financial accounts. She knew that when the auditors looked over the books there would be no hiding the fact that she had cooked the books and £3 million was missing. Four years ago, he vowed to strike back after discovering that a promoter was cooking the books. Note: The `books' in this expression are books of accounts.
2. If someone cooks the books, they dishonestly change written records. The committee admitted that, in its recent trials, many officials cooked the books.
See also: book, cook

cook the books

alter records, especially accounts, with fraudulent intent or in order to mislead. informal
Cook has been used since the mid 17th century in this figurative sense of ‘tamper with’ or ‘manipulate’.
See also: book, cook

ˌcook the ˈbooks

(informal) change facts or figures in order to make the situation seem better than it is or to hide the fact that you have stolen money: The two directors of the company had been cooking the books, a local court heard yesterday.
See also: book, cook

cook the books

Falsely adjust the accounts. The verb “to cook” has meant to manipulate ever since the 1600s and continued to be used, especially with reference to changing figures, to the present day. The current phrase popularized the concept, its rhyme more attractive than simply “cook the accounts,” and it has largely replaced other versions since the second half of the 1900s. The 1986 film Legal Eagles had it (“The three partners were cookin’ the books”), as did a New York Times editorial about the Environmental Protection Agency: “The agency was thus ordered to cook the books, deliberately underestimating the reductions that would be possible under alternative approaches . . .” (March 21, 2005).
See also: book, cook
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It has already emerged that one supplier was cooking the books and defrauded 4750,000 in the last three years.
Ask them about her sleeping arrangements and if she has been "cooking the books" call in the police.
MSPs yesterday accused Executive ministers of cooking the books to make their cost-cutting look tougher.
And with the taxpayer picking up the tab, there will be no excuse for cooking the books.
Bosses who needed to show profits for obscenely fat bonuses have conjured them out of thin air by cooking the books.
I seem to remember the Tories were accused of cooking the books regarding the employment figures when they were in power.
THE former chairman of cable and fibre optic company Anicom has been charged with cooking the books in what watchdogs are calling "a massive financial fraud".
SWOOPS on curry houses and chip shops have revealed dozens were cooking the books.
A prison union boss jailed for cooking the books has been given a cushy job behind bars ...
Mr Skilling, 50, is accused of cooking the books to hide the financial problems and of making pounds 60million by selling shares at artificially high prices.
THE term "income statement smoothing" sounds harmless enough - but it means cooking the books to hide losses from shareholders.
A FIRM of solicitors has been caught cooking the books, a court heard yesterday.