contradiction

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contradiction in terms

A phrase or expression that causes confusion because it contains words or ideas that contradict each other; an oxymoron. Jumbo shrimp is such a contradiction in terms.
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contradiction in terms

a statement containing a seeming contradiction. A wealthy pauper is a contradiction in terms. A straight-talking politician may seem to be a contradiction in terms.
See also: contradiction, term

contradiction in terms

A statement that seems to contradict itself, with one part of it denying another. For example, I've always believed that "a poor millionaire" was a contradiction in terms. [Late 1700s]
See also: contradiction, term

contradiction in terms

a statement or group of words associating objects or ideas which are incompatible.
1994 Toronto Life Veggie burger?— a contradiction in terms I had no wish to argue with: vegetables are fine and necessary, but in their place.
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a contraˌdiction in ˈterms

a statement or description containing two words or phrases that contradict each other’s meaning: They call their project ‘a peace offensive’, which seems to me a contradiction in terms.
See also: contradiction, term
References in periodicals archive ?
Repeated enough, political contradictions can lull us into giving up on critical thought altogether.
I'm confident that Contradictions is an alternative pop record that fulfils my own criteria.
Contradictions also emerge from the encounter between utopian attempts to transform the world and the need to implement such attempts in practice.
There are many other contradictions that can be added to this list, but this much is enough to show that Erdoy-an prefers to pursue such contradictions as way of making politics.
Brecht does not resort to effective renunciation of the old structure; instead, he solicits subversion from within the old structure by exposing contradictions and internal oppositions upon which the apparatus is founded.
Thus, in contrast to naive dialecticism of the East, Western dialectical thinking emphasizes three different laws: the law of identity, the law of contradiction, and the law of the excluded middle (Peng & Nisbett, 1999).
What remains important at present is the simple fact that although logical contradictions exist in the narrative, its protagonist (and its author) do not need to be consciously aware of them for them to exist.
When this folksy wisdom failed to convince, VP Singh added that politics was the art of managing contradictions.
In this situation, the afore-mentioned methods for identifying contradictions are not helpful.
This interpretation then leads Hahn to distinguish between organic (good) contradictions that motivate cognitive development and formal (bad) contradictions that undermine critical thought.
If Arabs, mostly Palestinian, living in the officially Jewish state of Israel have to deal with many contradictions of identity, than surely Israeli Arabs serving in the Israeli security apparatus, institutionally deployed against their fellow Arabs in the Occupied Territories, experience contradiction piled upon contradiction.
The demonstration of performative contradictions in particular cases serves to refute skeptical counterarguments.
There are great contradictions in our American life, says author Rodney Clapp--our longing for tradition and progress, holiness and hedonism, and violence and peace.
This work by David Ray Griffin shows that the official story of what happened on 9/11 is riddled with internal contradictions.