consequence

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damn the consequences

A phrase used when one intends to do something despite it likely having a negative effect or outcome. They decided to party the night before the exam and damn the consequences.
See also: consequence, damn

damn the expense

A phrase used when one intends to do something with little concern for how much it will cost. It's our baby's first birthday party, so we're getting a pony and damn the expense!
See also: damn, expense

face the consequences

To experience negative repercussions for one's actions or words, especially those that one would expect to incur punishment. I told you not to try to sneak in, and now that you've been caught, you're just going to have to face the consequences. If we do nothing to curb this pollution, I guarantee we will face the consequences in the future.
See also: consequence, face

in consequence

As a result (of something); therefore; thus. I heard you borrowed my car without permission. In consequence, you're grounded for two weeks. She didn't study for the exam and, in consequence, she failed. What did she think was going to happen?
See also: consequence

in consequence of (something)

As a result (of something). I heard you borrowed my car without permission. In consequence of your actions, you're grounded for two weeks. She didn't study for the exam and, in consequence of that, she failed. What did she think was going to happen?
See also: consequence, of

of consequence

Important; significant; having value. We only have a limited amount of time in which to conduct this meeting, so let's please stick to matters of consequence. He was the only person of consequence at the party, so once he left, I felt there was no longer a reason to stay.
See also: consequence, of

of little consequence

Not very important; having very little significance or value. The company makes so much money that the flop of this product on the market is actually of very little consequence to them. I'm of so little consequence in our organization that I doubt anyone would notice if I just stopped coming in one day.
See also: consequence, little, of

of no consequence

Completely unimportant; having no significance or value. This issue is really of no consequence to the board, so let's please skip it for the sake of everyone's time. Being a part of a large corporation can often leave you feeling like you're of no consequence.
See also: consequence, no, of

pay the consequences

To face, accept, or suffer repercussions for one's actions or words, especially that which would be expected to incur punishment. (A less common version of "suffer the consequences.") After three nights of heavy drinking, I'm really going to be paying the consequences come Monday morning! With the judge handing down the maximum possible sentence, this monster will be paying the consequences for his crimes for the rest of his life.
See also: consequence, pay

suffer the consequences

To experience negative repercussions for one's actions or words, especially those that one would expect to incur punishment. I told you not to try to sneak in, and now that you've been caught, you're just going to have to suffer the consequences. If we do nothing to curb this pollution, I guarantee we will suffer the consequences in the future.
See also: consequence, suffer
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in consequence (of something)

as a result of something; because of something. In consequence of the storm, there was no electricity. The wind blew down the wires. In consequence, we had no electricity.
See also: consequence
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in consequence

As a result, therefore, as in She was away for years and in consequence has few friends here. The prepositional phrase in consequence of means "as a result of," as in In consequence of this finding, there is sure to be further investigation. [Late 1600s]
See also: consequence

of consequence

Important, as in For all matters of consequence we have to consult the board, or Only scientists of consequence have been invited to speak. This idiom was first recorded in 1489.
See also: consequence, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in ˈconsequence (of something)

(formal) as a result of something: The child was born deformed in consequence of an injury to its mother.
See also: consequence

ˈdamn the consequences, expense, etc.

(spoken) used to say that you are going to do something even though you know it may be expensive, have bad results, etc: Let’s celebrate and damn the expense!
See also: damn
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in consequence

As a result; consequently.
See also: consequence
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Again, our policy simply requires that we consider collateral consequences when they arise and seek to mitigate them in appropriate situations.
Choi said that he has been moving in this direction for several years and also said that prosecutors within and without Minnesota are finding different ways to address collateral consequences.
Example: To date, the program is achieving lower-than-expected structural properties (condition) due to processing anomalies with the selected wing skin material (cause); therefore, a heavier wing design or a reduced high-g maneuver capability (7.0 g to 6.0 g) may result (consequences).
Example: Because the program is experiencing processing difficulties with the wing skin material (cause), the anticipated structural properties may not be achieved (event or condition), resulting in a heavier wing design or a reduced high-g maneuver capability (7.0 g to 6.0 g) (consequences).
This Article's primary claim is that attaching those sorts of collateral consequences to misdemeanor offenses provides prosecutors with strong incentives to charge a borderline case as a misdemeanor rather than a felony.
Collateral consequences can frequently be used to further a prosecutor's sentencing aims, including the standard goal of reducing threats to public safety.
Collateral consequences have long been hidden, buried in the language of state and federal statutes and codes, without a straightforward way for individuals, their attorneys or their sentencing judges to know which ones might be pertinent and applicable to a specific situation.
The results of ABA's study has been released in the form of an interactive website, the National Inventory of the Collateral Consequences of Conviction (NICCC), which is a publicly accessible database comprising more than 45,000 collateral consequences and civil disabilities.
Those who had read about negative health consequences were also more likely to state an intention to consume less alcohol.
(2015).The effects of social and health consequence framing on heavy drinking intentions among college students.
How stigma and its consequences are currently considered by
V COLLATERAL CONSEQUENCES THAT ARISE FROM LEGISLATION
When are we willing to endure short-term pain for long-term positive consequences? Why and when do we procrastinate?
In the study of Ortu et al., (2008), the combination of responses were the IBCs that produced the aggregate product, which was the sum of the individual consequences. (The sum was only possible as a result of a particular combination of participants" responses.) The cultural consequence was the presentation of the market gains or losses, which added or subtracted points for the group contingent on the aggregate product of the IBC.
However, in the second experiment, the subjects were again interviewed about their prior criminal and unethical behaviors but this time, the proximal and distal consequences were reversed from the first experiment.
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