pinko (commie)

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Related to Commies: communist, communism, Kommunisme

pinko (commie)

1. noun A derogatory term for someone who holds liberal, socialist, or communist political views or beliefs. My uncle was labeled as a pinko all his life for trying to improve workers' rights in his region. So you want the government to give everyone free housing, free healthcare, and free food? What are you, some kind of pinko commie?
2. adjective Having very liberal, socialist, or communist political views or beliefs. It's pinko liberals like you who are driving up our taxes! My pinko commie brother-in-law thinks anyone making a profit for themselves is inherently greedy.
See also: pinko
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

pinko

1. n. a communist. (Popular during the 1950s.) Get out of here, you pinko!
2. mod. having communist tendencies; in the manner of a communist. Get that pinko jerk out of here!
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Red Scared: The Commie Menace in Propaganda and Popular Culture, by Michael Barson and Steven Heller.
Commies are portrayed as either unlikable or downright villainous.
You cannot blame the commies for returning to the successful formula of backing a millionaire businessman as Vass had turned out to be good president and the party leadership knows that after the Tof fiasco, it would take a few decades, if not centuries, before people voted for an Akelite to run the economy again.
He also attacked the Story Analysts Guild, charging that readers "gave poor reports on stories not submitted by their commie friends."
"Almost all of us were Catholic because the theory was we wouldn't be Commies," Kelleher says.
(See "Free Your Radio.") A former college and community radio DJ, Walker is quick to diagnose what's lacking on the airwaves today: "Most stations can't imagine what the Velvet Underground might have in common with Hank Williams Jr., and would never dream of playing them in the same set." Walker also subjects historian Ronald Radosh's controversial memoir, Commies, to a withering cross-examination.
Conservatism is at its most eloquent when, as an early National Review editorial nicely put it, it stands athwart history yelling "Stop!" By the end of the eighties, the Evil Empire lay in ruins (for which Reagan and conservatives can justifiably pat themselves on the back; the commies sure didn't surrender to Anthony Lewis), so the problem became, What are we going to be against now?
And teach him John Birch songs and stuff That Dad and Dan sang by the hour-- Sad songs of how the commies plant Such spies as Dwight D.
This choice was vetoed by the commies of AKEL when it was run by them by Nik, because they loathe Pol Pol from his time as the one-man investigative committee that found comrade Tof responsible for the Mari explosion.
The Communities Secretary - behind swingeing town hall cuts - showed his backing for their rabid views as he told the Commons meeting that "unless we are vigilant, cigar-chomping Commies" would grab power.
How would you feel if the Communist party in France fired 2,000 rockets at us in England and the French said: "It's the Commies, not us'?
Very small (average height 5 feet 5 inches) but uncommonly quick and in tune as a unit, the so-dubbed Commies overcame cool initial curiosity to become crowd faves.
Commies: Journey Through the Old Left, the New Left, and the Leftover Left, by Ronald Radosh, San Francisco: Encounter Books, 216 pages, $24.95
Maybe the most pathetic, but surprisingly sympathetic character is that of Tommy Crickshaw (Bill Murray), a washed-up ventriloquist who takes money from the Federal Theater Project, only to complain that the Project is crawling with unfunny commies. But Crickshaw, with all his rightwing rhetoric, isn't that different from the sloganeering Rivera.