come again


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come again

1. Can you say that again? Sometimes used jocularly or sarcastically to indicate that one thinks that what was just said was ridiculous, unbelievable, etc. Come again? I didn't hear what you said. You want me to pay you $100 for that? Come again?
2. Return to this place (often a store) again in the future. The shop owner handed me my bag and told me to come again.
See also: again, come

come again?

Could you please repeat what you just said? The phrase can be used in a straightforward way, or by the speaker to indicate that they think what has just been said is unreasonable, ridiculous, or absurd in some way. Sorry, Mike, come again? The connection is bad and I couldn't hear you. A: "I just quit my job to join the circus as a netless trapeze artist!" B: "Come again?"
See also: come
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Come again.

 
1. Please come back again sometime. Mary: I had a lovely time. Thank you for asking me. Sally: You're quite welcome. come again. "Come again," said Mrs. Martin as she let Jimmy out the door.
2. Rur. (usually Come again?) I didn't hear what you said. Please repeat it. Sally: Do you want some more carrots? Mary: Come again? Sally: Carrots. Do you want some more carrots?
See also: again, come
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

come again

What did you say? as in Come again? I can't believe you said that. This expression takes the literal meaning of the phrase-return-to ask someone to repeat a statement, either because it wasn't heard clearly or because its truth is being questioned. [Colloquial; second half of 1800s]
See also: again, come
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

come again

Used as a request to repeat what was said.
See also: again, come
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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