code-switch

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code-switch

1. To alternate between two or more languages while speaking. My mom grew up in Quebec, and though she speaks English fluently now, she still sometimes code-switches back to French mid-sentence.
2. To change one's language or manner of speaking or communication to match one's current environment or audience. Many African Americans spend their whole life code-switching. Sorry for the tween slang—I tend to code-switch when I'm around my kids.

code-switching

1. The act or practice of alternating between two or more languages while speaking. My mom grew up in Quebec, and though she speaks English fluently now, she's prone to code-switching back to French mid-sentence.
2. The act or practice of changing one's language or manner of speaking or communication to match one's current environment or audience. Code-switching is an inherent part of African-American culture. Code-switching is a big part of communicating with my kids—I try to use the terms they know.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dueling languages: Grammatical Structure in Code switching. Oxford: Clarendon Myers-Scotton, C., and Bolonyai, A.
Unfortunately, there has been little research examining bilinguals' perceptions of code switching. Pagett (2006) found that bilingual children (in primary school settings) born and raised in a foreign land feel more comfortable speaking in L2 with their monolingual friends in school environments and feel uncomfortable revealing their bilingual identity to their peers.
Whether we are dealing with controversial issues or more mundane subjects, code switching based on those varied jargon jars is a necessary tool in the communication process we call interpretation, and a powerful one--as long as everyone knows the code.
T's pathological code switching can be attributed to impairment in the executive control resulting from damage to the frontal lobe.
Code switching may be considered in relation to language acquisition.
Clinical and technical information in most African languages involves inexact terminology and code switching, thus lacking the explanatory power of the English language.
The observations primarily focused on the learner's talk in classroom interaction and then on code switching for requesting TL equivalents as the product of that interaction taking place between a learner and the teacher.
On what grounds do we decide which code switching practices are permissible and which ones are not?
CODE SWITCHING: HOW TO TALK SO MEN WILL LISTEN offers a method of opening communication lines between the genders, presenting a 'gender code' and common conflicts and outlining strategies based on examples and anecdotes showing how others have used these practices to break stereotypes.
Authored by Claire Damken Brown and Audrey Nelson, the book, titled 'Code Switching: How to Talk So Men Will Listen', examines different email styles adopted by men and women in the workplace.
ABSTRACT This article explores the issue of how teachers' use of code switching (i.e., language alternation or language exchange between two languages) can be a counter productive for students in the EFL classrooms.