cosleep

(redirected from Co-sleep)
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cosleep

Of a parent, to sleep in the same bed or room as one or more of their small or infant children. We're going to try cosleeping once the baby is born.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We know from talking to parents that if they are told not to co-sleep they will then feel they cannot discuss what actually happens.
My wife then started to co-sleep with them and we carried on in separate bedrooms.
He told the inquest hearing: "We know that there is an increased risk of sudden infant death in children that co-sleep with adults.
The images feature kids with signs declaring a wide variety of parenting choices -- that their parents vaccinated them, or that they still co-sleep, or that they are home-schooled.
"I had a very difficult time with her, because she would only sleep on my chest, and only for a couple of hours." But she chose to co-sleep nonetheless, because that's what worked best for the kids.
"I co-sleep with him and I've been doing it for over a year so I couldn't imagine not doing that and leaving him behind.
01 (ANI): Turns out, mothers who co-sleep with infants beyond six months may feel more depressed and judged by others.
Some research supports differences in infants sleep when infants co-sleep and breastfeed--in that these sleep practices are associated with more time in lighter sleep states due to frequency of feeding, but that total sleep time for infants is similar across infants co-sleeping and infants who settle themselves to sleep (Middlemiss, Yaure, & Huey, 2014).
Studies have proven that babies who co-sleep startle and cry less than those who sleep in a separate room from their parents.
Parents choose to co-sleep reporting they feel closer to the child.
Some older children who co-sleep have difficulty transitioning to their own bed and will demand to sleep with the parents well past puberty.
The infant's sleeping location, in particular whether or not they co-sleep with their parents, is associated with night waking.
Yet she is tireless in her attack on people who co-sleep, nurse, limit TV watching, and focus too much attention on their kids.