Christmas

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a white Christmas

Christmas day when it is or has been snowing. Growing up in south Texas, I could only ever fantasize about having a white Christmas.
See also: Christmas, white

all (one's) Christmases have come at once

Said when one is experiencing a an extraordinary amount of good fortune. Primarily heard in UK. Wait, let me get this straight: the planning permission came through very quickly, the bank approved our second loan application, and the weather is supposed to stay sunny and dry for the next few months? Wow, all our Christmases have come at once! Seeing my beautiful baby girl for the first time, well, it felt like all my Christmases had come at once.
See also: all, Christmas, come, have, once

cancel (one's) Christmas

slang To kill someone. As soon as that guy becomes a liability, I'll get Ray to cancel his Christmas, no problem.
See also: cancel, Christmas

Christmas comes but once a year

A phrase that defends enthusiastic celebrations of Christmas, on the basis that Christmas only happens once a year. I know the amount of gifts is a little excessive, but Christmas comes but once a year, right?
See also: but, Christmas, come, once, year

Christmas disease

Hemophilia (or haemophilia) B, a blood-clotting disorder in which a mutation of the Factor IX gene leads to a deficiency of Factor IX (or Christmas factor), a serine protease of the coagulation system. Both the factor and the disease are named for Stephen Christmas (not the holiday), the first patient discovered to have the condition in 1952. We haven't let our daughter participate in any more physical sports since she was diagnosed with Christmas disease last year.
See also: Christmas, disease

Christmas graduate

A college or university student who discontinues their education after the end of the first term (i.e., around Christmastime). Primarily heard in US, South Africa. While I firmly believe in the importance of continued education, there are always a few Christmas graduates each year for whom college is just not well suited.
See also: Christmas, graduate

Christmas tree bill

In the US Congress, a minor bill that attracts many additional (and often unrelated) amendments attached to it, thus likened to ornaments hung upon a Christmas tree. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. If one really wants to see how corporate interests pervade the political process, one must simply examine the numerous amendments of the so-called Christmas tree bills that crop up each year.
See also: bill, Christmas, tree

Happy Christmas

A standard expression of good wishes said to someone on or shortly before Christmas. Primarily heard in UK, Ireland. A: "Happy Christmas, Tommy!" B: "Thanks, Dad. Happy Christmas to you, too!" We just wanted to come by and wish you a happy Christmas!
See also: Christmas, happy

like turkeys voting for an early Christmas

Said of people who choose or accept a situation that is not in their interest or will be directly harmful to them. Turkeys are often prepared for a Christmas meal. Primarily heard in UK. So now you have people supporting policies that would see their work security and health benefits eliminated. It's like turkeys voting for an early Christmas.

like turkeys voting for Christmas

Said of people who choose or accept a situation that is not in their interest or will be directly harmful to them. Turkeys are often prepared for a Christmas meal. So now you have people supporting policies that would see their work security and health benefits eliminated. It's like turkeys voting for Christmas.
See also: Christmas, like, turkey, vote

Merry Christmas

A standard expression of good wishes said to someone on or shortly before Christmas. A: "Merry Christmas, Tommy!" B: "Thanks, Dad. Merry Christmas to you, too!" We just wanted to wish you a merry Christmas!
See also: Christmas, merry

merry Christmas and a happy new year

A standard if somewhat formal expression of good wishes said to someone during the winter holiday season. The entire phrase is typically capitalized if said as a standalone salutation. We would like to wish all of our customers a very Merry Christmas and a happy New Year! Thank you for all of your help, Colin. Merry Christmas, and a Happy New Year!
See also: and, Christmas, happy, merry, new, year
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cancel someone's Christmas

Sl. to kill someone; to destroy someone. (Underworld or jocular; the idea is that the dead person will not live until Christmas.) If he keeps bugging me, I'm gonna cancel his Christmas. Willie threatened to cancel Richard's Christmas if Richard didn't pay up.
See also: cancel, Christmas

Christmas comes but once a year.

Prov. Since Christmas only happens once a year, we should treat it as a special time by being good to others or by indulging children. Christmas comes but once a year, so we urge you to give to those less fortunate through this Christmas charity campaign.
See also: but, Christmas, come, once, year
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

like turkeys voting for Christmas

BRITISH
If someone's action or choice is like turkeys voting for Christmas, it will have a very bad result for them. Lawyers supporting non-legal methods of solving disputes are like turkeys voting for Christmas. The idea that drivers would choose to have speed limiters in their cars would be like turkeys voting for Christmas. Note: In Britain and some other countries, people traditionally eat turkey at Christmas.
See also: Christmas, like, turkey, vote
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

like turkeys voting for Christmas

used to suggest that a particular action or decision is hopelessly self-defeating. informal
See also: Christmas, like, turkey, vote
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a white ˈChristmas

a Christmas when it snows
See also: Christmas, white
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cancel someone’s Christmas

tv. to kill someone; to destroy someone. (Underworld. The dead person will miss Christmas.) If he keeps bugging me, I’m gonna cancel his Christmas.
See also: cancel, Christmas

Christmas tree

n. a drunkard. (From being lit like a Christmas tree.) A well-dressed Christmas tree sat in the corner—lit up, of course.
See also: Christmas, tree
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Christmas comes but once a year

Take this opportunity to enjoy yourself to the fullest. This seemingly modern cliché actually dates from the sixteenth century, when Thomas Tusser included it as one of his Five Hundreth Pointes of Good Husbandrie (1573): “At Christmas play and make good cheere, for Christmas comes but once a yeere.”
See also: but, Christmas, come, once, year
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Father Felim Kelly told mourners how he had visited the devout Catholic family a couple of Christmasses ago to find a blissfully happy domestic scene, Clodagh "with her scones, red jam and mug of coffee, Liam and Ryan, like budding engineers building all kinds of Lego, Alan standing with his back to the kitchen sink totally at ease enjoying the antics of unspoiled and respectful sons.
Newport-based GLC, meanwhile, said they were inspired to satirise the materialism of modern Christmasses, namechecking unwanted presents being sold off on eBay and festive transport woes - interspersed with a clip of a downbeat EastEnders Christmas special featuring Arthur Fowler having a nervous breakdown.
BBC1 has even had the cheek to make a festive promo featuring clips of legendary shows from Christmasses past.
As (a) Christmas present it does good service, although without entirely banishing the impression that Christmasses past were that little bit more fun.
Sky's Christmasses all came at once when the Paraguayan aimed his phlegm towards Richard Stearman.
Many of the residents fully embrace the Christmas name, with its fire engines named Rudolph, Dasher and Blitzen and two 12ft-tall fibreglass Father Christmasses on the roof of the local motel.
Gavin Sharp "thought all his Christmasses had come at once" when he saw his massively inflated bank balance at a cashpoint in March.
She's the kind of mother who kept up her grieving widow act on Christmasses and Sunday lunches as they looked at their dad's empty seat at the head of the table.
He said: "It had been one of the lousiest Christmasses I'd ever had.
Also, the fact Christmas produce is being launched earlier each year means some shopkeepers are Christmassed out by the time it arrives.
The Oscar-winner says he enjoyed very traditional family Christmasses when growing up in Arkansas and loves that time of the year.
Now that's out of the way, we can look at just some of the reasons Die Hard is one of the most Christmas films to have ever Christmassed.
He had two brothers, but one died three years ago and he lost touch with the other two years ago He told the ECHO: "I've lived on my own since 1990, and I've spent about four or five Christmasses alone.