choice

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drug of choice

1. An illicit substance one is addicted to or tends to prefer. I dabbled with a few different recreational drugs in college, but marijuana was my drug of choice.
2. The favored pharmaceutical treatment for a given medical condition or ailment. Lithium has long been the drug of choice for many physicians to treat depression and bipolar disorder.
3. By extension, any habit, activity, or vice that one is particularly fond of or dependent upon. A lot of people resort to drugs or alcohol to cope with their problems, but exercise has always been my drug of choice. Coffee became my drug of choice after working as a barista for three years during college.
See also: choice, drug, of

be spoiled for choice

To have an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in US. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are spoiled for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoiled for choice.
See also: choice, spoil

spoiled for choice

Having an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in US. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are being brought up spoiled for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoiled for choice.
See also: choice, spoil

spoilt for choice

Having an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in UK. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are being brought up spoilt for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat, we were spoilt for choice.
See also: choice, spoilt

beggars can't be choosers

You must accept that which is given to you, especially if you don't have the means to acquire it yourself. That dress wasn't exactly what I would have picked for myself, but, hey, it was free, and I'm broke right now. Beggars can't be choosers.
See also: beggar

by choice

Intentionally; based on one's own decision or interest. I know a lot of these volunteers are forced to be here, but I'm here by choice.
See also: by, choice

be spoilt for choice

To have an abundance of suitable or ideal options from which to choose, such that it may be difficult to make a decision. Primarily heard in UK. Between video games, television, and the Internet, kids these days are spoilt for choice when it comes to their entertainment. Our hotel was right in the midst of the city's finest restaurants, so whenever we wanted something to eat we were spoilt for choice.
See also: choice, spoilt

Hobson's choice

Something that seems to be a choice but isn't. The phrase refers to British stable owner Thomas Hobson, who was known to act as though he only had one horse to rent to each patron, even when his stable was full. A: "This rental car is terrible." B: "Well, did you want to walk all the way from the airport to the hotel? It was Hobson's choice."
See also: choice

of (one's) choice

As chosen or desired by oneself, among all the options. They took me to the pet shop and told me I could have the puppy of my choice.
See also: choice, of

you pays your money, and you takes your choice

When you buy something, you must accept the risk that it will not be what you wanted. I'm sorry to hear that the laptop you bought online doesn't work, but you pays your money, and you takes your choice.
See also: and, choice, pay, take

you pay your money, and you take your choice

When you buy something, you must accept the risk that it will not be what you wanted. I'm sorry to hear that the laptop you bought online doesn't work, but you pay your money and you take your choice.
See also: and, choice, pay, take

pay your money and take your choice

When you buy something, you must accept the risk that it will not be what you wanted. I'm sorry to hear that the laptop you bought online doesn't work, but pay your money and take your choice.
See also: and, choice, money, pay, take

Beggars can't be choosers.

Prov. If someone gives you something you asked for, you should not complain about what you get. I asked Joe to lend me his bicycle, and he sent me this old, rusty one. But beggars can't be choosers. Jill: Let me wear your green dress; I don't like the blue one you lent me. Jane: Beggars can't be choosers.
See also: Beggar

by choice

due to conscious choice; on purpose. I do this kind of thing by choice. No one makes me do it. I didn't go to this college by choice. It was the closest one to home.
See also: by, choice

Hobson's choice

the choice between taking what is offered and getting nothing at all. (From the name of a stable owner in the seventeenth century who always hired out the horse nearest the door.) We didn't really want that particular hotel, but it was a case of Hobson's choice. We booked very late and there was nothing else left. If you want a yellow car, it's Hobson's choice. The garage has only one.
See also: choice

beggars can't be choosers

Those in dire need must be content with what they get. For example, The cheapest model will have to do-beggars can't be choosers. This expression was familiar enough to be included in John Heywood's 1546 collection of proverbs.
See also: beggar

by choice

Deliberately, as a matter of preference. For example, No one told me to come; I'm here by choice. This expression replaced the earlier with choice, used from about 1500.
See also: by, choice

Hobson's choice

An apparently free choice that actually offers no alternative. For example, My dad said if I wanted the car I could have it tonight or not at all-that's Hobson's choice . This expression alludes to Thomas Hobson of Cambridge, England, who rented horses and allowed each customer to take only the horse nearest the stable door. [Mid-1600s]
See also: choice

of choice

Preferred above others, as in A strike is the union's weapon of choice. Used with other prepositions ( by, for, with), all meaning "by preference," this idiom dates from about 1300.
See also: choice, of

pay your money and take your choice

Also, you pays your money and takes your choice. Since you're paying, it's your decision, as in We can take the train or the bus-you pays your money and takes your choice. This term first appeared in the English humor magazine Punch in the mid-1800s and has been repeated ever since.
See also: and, choice, money, pay, take

beggars can't be choosers

You say beggars can't be choosers to mean that you should not reject an option if it is the only one which is available to you. Initially I'd take any job that was offered me — beggars can't be choosers. There are some apartments available, and beggars can't be choosers, but they're not very nice.
See also: beggar

Hobson's choice

mainly BRITISH
You can call a decision Hobson's choice when it forces you to choose something because in reality there is no other choice available. He was faced with a Hobson's choice between obedience and ruin, so he gave in to their demands. Only the satellite companies were offering enough money to screen the games, so it was Hobson's choice really. Note: This expression may refer to a man called Thomas Hobson, who earned money by hiring out horses at the end of the 16th century. He had a particular system for using each horse in turn, so a customer was given no choice, even if there were many horses available.
See also: choice

beggars can't be choosers

people with no other options must be content with what is offered. proverb
See also: beggar

Hobson's choice

no choice at all.
Thomas Hobson , to whom this expression refers, was a carrier at Cambridge in the early 17th century, who would not allow his clients their own choice of horse from his stables as he insisted on hiring them out in strict rotation. They were offered the ‘choice’ of the horse nearest the door or none at all. Hobson's choice is also mid 20th-century British rhyming slang for voice .
See also: choice

you pays your money and you takes your choice

used to convey that there is little to choose between one alternative and another.
Both pays and takes are non-standard, colloquial forms, retained from the original version of the saying in a Punch joke of 1846 .
See also: and, choice, money, pay, take

be spoilt for choice

have so many attractive possibilities to choose from that it is difficult to make a selection. British
See also: choice, spoilt

ˌbeggars can’t be ˈchoosers

(saying) when there is no choice, you have to be satisfied with whatever you can get: I would have preferred a bed, but beggars can’t be choosers so I slept on the sofa in the living room.
See also: beggar

be spoilt/spoiled for ˈchoice

have so many opportunities or things to choose from that it is difficult to make a decision: I’ve had so many job offers that I’m spoilt for choice.
See also: choice, spoil, spoilt

by ˈchoice

because you have chosen: I wouldn’t go there by choice.
See also: by, choice

of ˈchoice (for somebody/something)

(used after a noun) that is chosen by a particular group of people or for a particular purpose: It’s the software of choice for business use.
See also: choice, of

of your ˈchoice

that you choose yourself: First prize will be a meal for two at the restaurant of your choice.
See also: choice, of

ˌHobson’s ˈchoice

the choice of taking what is offered or nothing at all, in reality no choice at all: It’s Hobson’s choice really, as this is the only room they have empty at the moment.This expression refers to a 17th-century Cambridge man, Tobias Hobson, who hired out horses; he would give his customers the ‘choice’ of the horse nearest the stable door or none at all.
See also: choice

you ˌpays your ˌmoney and you ˌtakes your ˈchoice

(saying) used to say that there is not much difference between two or more alternatives, so you should choose whichever you prefer: It’s hard to say which explanation is more likely; it’s more a matter of you pays your money and you takes your choice.
The unusual grammar in this idiom copies the speech of showmen at a fairground.
See also: and, choice, money, pay, take

choice

mod. nice; cool. We had a choice time at Tom’s party.

of choice

Preferred above others of the same kind or set: "the much used leveraged buyout as the weapon of choice" (Alison Leigh Cowan).
See also: choice, of

Hobson's choice

No choice at all, take it or leave it. Thomas Hobson ran a livery stable in Cambridge, England, in the 16th century. He had a simple policy about renting out his horses: you took what he gave you or you went horseless (some accounts say he rented whichever animal was in the stall nearest the door). Hobson's spirit lives on in the joke about a passenger aboard El Al Airlines who asked the flight attendant what the choice of dinner was. She replied with a smile, “The choice is yes or no.”
See also: choice
References in periodicals archive ?
It's true that human minds cannot evaluate an infinite number of choices, and that we're prone to feel regret when we think about the alternatives we've forgone.
Zion's experience, combined with the results of a recent two-year-old federal choice program, suggests that the impact of school choice on school performance will be far less revolutionary than its supporters from both parties envision.
Hess's second case study focuses on the five-year-old voucher plan in Cleveland, where he finds that the potential benefits of choice and competition were neutralized by multiple factors, including frequent changes in leadership, the state's move to take over the city's schools, the modest size of the vouchers (only $2,250), and the existence of strong unions.
With Patient Choice, together we offer an approach that's truly market driven, where consumers can easily shop for value and providers compete for market share based on their performance.
Express Choice offers plan sponsors a better way to let their members choose between prescription drug plans, allowing each member to get the plan that's right for him or her," said Barrett Toan, chairman and chief executive officer of Express Scripts.
At least four, and possibly six, new HDTV channels will launch by September, bringing the total number of HDTV channels on Star Choice to six or even eight.
Under the Patient Choice program, providers align themselves into networks called "care systems" that include primary care physicians, specialists, hospitals and other health professionals.
The design for the Web site incorporates the Wise Choices campaign artwork and is a one-stop spot on the Internet for California raisin recipes, nutrition facts and manufacturing information.
If a person is to experience personal satisfaction, quality of life and empowerment, they must have the ability to make choices and decisions regarding his or her own life (Kosciulek, 1999).
On the other hand, having an ever-expanding number of choices doesn't necessarily make us happier, just as bigger and bigger food portions don't make us healthier.
Perhaps we need to find out what kinds of choices, in what areas of life, actually promote freedom, and what kinds of choices restrict it.
If you define your space to allow for the healthy choices of another person and for yours to co-exist, both you and the other person will be supported in becoming the script of your original personality.
RAND puts it this way: if policymakers are to make an informed judgment on vouchers, they need "a thorough and objective empirical assessment on the literature, RAND promises "accurate data," "careful objective analysis," and "a clear picture of the choices [we] face in educating America's citizens.
However, because rehabilitation professionals are working with humans and not automatons, the individuals' choices to work or not to work must always be noticed and respected.
As health insurers provide more choices for employees, the tenets of group underwriting face greater strains.