Chinaman

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carry a Chinaman on (one's) back

To suffer from an addiction to narcotics or the withdrawal symptoms caused by it. A derogatory phrase, it likely refers to opium's classical association with Southeast Asia. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Carrying that Chinaman on her back has kept Janet out of work for years. I want to get clean and turn my life around, but carrying this Chinaman on my back is absolute torture.
See also: back, carry, Chinaman, on

Chinaman's chance

Little or no chance at all; a completely hopeless prospect. This derogatory phrase originated in the 1800s and referred to Chinese immigrants who worked for extremely low wages, faced racism and higher taxation, and were prohibited from testifying in court for violence committed against them. Primarily heard in US, South Africa.
See also: chance

have a Chinaman at (one's) neck

To suffer from an addiction to narcotics or the withdrawal symptoms caused by it. A derogatory phrase, it likely refers to opium's classical association with Southeast Asia. Having that Chinaman at her neck has kept Janet out of work for years. I want to get clean and turn my life around, but having this Chinaman at my neck is absolute torture.
See also: Chinaman, have, neck

have a Chinaman on (one's) back

To suffer from an addiction to narcotics or the withdrawal symptoms caused by it. A derogatory phrase, it likely refers to opium's classical association with Southeast Asia. Having that Chinaman on her back has kept Janet out of work for years. I want to get clean and turn my life around, but having this Chinaman on my back is absolute torture.
See also: back, Chinaman, have, on

not a Chinaman's chance

offensive slang, dated Absolutely no chance whatsoever. This racist, derogatory phrase originated in the 1800s and referred to Chinese immigrants who worked for extremely low wages, faced racism and higher taxation, and were prohibited from testifying in court for violence committed against them. "Chinaman" is a racial slur for a Chinese person. Primarily heard in US. A: "They don't have a Chinaman's chance of winning the championship." B: "Grandad! You can't say offensive things like that anymore!"
See also: chance, not

Chinaman's chance

Also, ghost of a chance. An extremely slim chance, a hopeless undertaking. Both versions are most often put negatively, as in He hasn't a Chinaman's chance of finishing the work in time, or They haven't a ghost of a chance to get as far as the playoffs. The first term, now considered offensive, dates from the late 1800s when many Chinese immigrants came to work in California and were resented because they worked for lower wages. Its precise allusion is unclear. The variant, which relies on the meaning of ghost as an insubstantial shadow, dates from the mid-1800s. Also see the synonyms fat chance; not an earthly chance.
See also: chance

not a Chinaman's chance

Also, not a ghost of a chance. See under Chinaman's chance.
See also: chance, not

not a Chinaman's chance

not even a very slight chance.
1952 Frank Yerby A Woman Called Fancy You haven't a Chinaman's chance of raising that money in Boston.
See also: chance, not

Chinaman's chance, he hasn't a/not a

No chance whatever. The term dates from the latter half of the nineteenth century, when Chinese immigrants came to California to help build railroads. Their presence was sharply opposed because they would work for far less than white workers. “We are ruined by cheap labor,” wrote Bret Harte in his poem “Plain Language from Truthful James.” According to some authorities, the term applied to those Chinese who tried to supplement their earnings by working claims and streams abandoned by gold prospectors, a virtually hopeless undertaking. Others, poet John Ciardi among them, believe it derives from the way they were regarded as virtually subhuman and had no legal recourse if, for example, they were robbed, attacked, or otherwise abused. It largely replaced the older not a dog’s chance, at least in America, but is now considered offensive. Also see fat chance; snowball's chance.
See also: he, not

Chinaman's chance

Slim to no possibility. There have been several explanations about the origin of this odious phrase, all arising from Chinese immigrants working in the American West. One is that they were given the most dangerous jobs, such as setting and igniting explosives. Another is that judges and juries routinely convicted Chinese defendants on the flimsiest of evidence. A third is that Chinese miners were allowed to work gold claims only after others had taken the best ore. In any event, “Chinaman's chance” should be relegated to the slag heap.
See also: chance
References in periodicals archive ?
What we can see, hear, and feel is the purity, peace, beauty, eternity, and spirit, shining in the unworldly and natural scene of "a long-legged bird," "water-course," "cherry-branch," "house," "mountain," "sky," "Chinamen," and "melodies," the core of which is "gay" in the "glittering eyes" (39-56) staring at the "tragic scene" (52).
so our Chinese school is watched very strictly." (131) The oldest Chinese mission worker in New York stated that she did not "believe in young girls teaching Chinamen" because the Chinese continue to "hold a fascination for young American girls after they once come in contact...." (132) Some worried young female missionaries would end up like other white women who "consort[ed] with the Mongolians for a thimbleful of [opium]." (133) Munsey's Magazine published "Woman's Love of the Exotic" suggesting the public perception of the issue:
so our Chinese school is watched very strictly." A Kansas City detective thought that society should "prevent young girls from wrecking their lives by attempting to Christianize Orientals." The oldest Chinese mission worker in New York stated that she did not "believe in young girls teaching Chinamen" because the Chinese continue to "hold a fascination for young American girls ...
Yet unlike the rather frosty reception of the 'Ghineze' tramp and his 'kailyard brogue', the Scottified platitudes and 'Hooch, ayes!' of Mr Lim--'one of the richest Chinamen in the world'--were deemed wholly appropriate by his Scottish guest, despite an initial 'discomfiture'.
Jukes has a sudden insight: "'It struck me in a flash that these confounded Chinamen couldn't tell we weren't a desperate kind of robbers.
When three Cuban smuggling brokers are trying to persuade him to smuggle, one of them says "Can Chinamen talk?", expecting the Morgan to reply "No." The Cuban broker is attempting to emphasize that Chinese immigrants are nothing less than linguistically helpless; however, Morgan's vigilance about their linguistic potential is clear when he responds, "They can talk but I can't understand them" (THHN 5).
The previously unpublished second chapter, 'Butterfly women, "Chinamen", dope fiends and metropolitan allure', is an excellent addition, as it helps to bring together the different strands of Bland's arguments about 'types' of women (p4), and examines in depth the meanings generated by recurrent use of Orientalist discourse in trial proceedings, press coverage and other media.
They tied pigtails to horses and dragged chinamen" (144), "demon women and children threw the wounded back in the flames" (146).
"Chinatown" and "Chinamen" signified sexual danger and cultural degradation.
She'd been told that Jews who married Chinamen could leave Germany so she got engaged to man called Schu Ka Ling.
Then, the "Chinamen" arrive to work, helping Sugar envision a wider world in her future.
"There is an extraordinary collection of porcelain nodding head Chinamen - like nodding dogsbut on this occasion corpulent Chinese men with pointy hats.
The first clause of Jack's treaty provides for peace and friendship between "the Modoc and Klamath Indians, and John and Jim, of the Scott's Valley and Hamburg Indians, and Josh and Jack, for the Shastas" and ensures that "any one Indian or squaw may travel through your country safely." The second clause agrees that the tribes will "live on terms of friendship and peace with the white men, and the negroes and Chinamen living under white men's laws." The third clause asserts, "You shall not rob Chinamen of their gold, or rob their sluice boxes..
2001: The National Congress of American Indians prints a poster featuring a Cleveland Indians baseball cap alongside those from the (imaginary) New York Jews and San Francisco Chinamen. It goes viral in 2013 when the controversy over the Washington football team's name heats up.
This is where all the spin docs enter, bowling chinamen and doosras to beguile and befuddle.