Chinaman

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have a Chinaman on (one's) back

To suffer from an addiction to narcotics or the withdrawal symptoms caused by it. A derogatory phrase, it likely refers to opium's classical association with Southeast Asia. Having that Chinaman on her back has kept Janet out of work for years. I want to get clean and turn my life around, but having this Chinaman on my back is absolute torture.
See also: back, Chinaman, have, on

have a Chinaman at (one's) neck

To suffer from an addiction to narcotics or the withdrawal symptoms caused by it. A derogatory phrase, it likely refers to opium's classical association with Southeast Asia. Having that Chinaman at her neck has kept Janet out of work for years. I want to get clean and turn my life around, but having this Chinaman at my neck is absolute torture.
See also: Chinaman, have, neck

carry a Chinaman on (one's) back

To suffer from an addiction to narcotics or the withdrawal symptoms caused by it. A derogatory phrase, it likely refers to opium's classical association with Southeast Asia. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Carrying that Chinaman on her back has kept Janet out of work for years. I want to get clean and turn my life around, but carrying this Chinaman on my back is absolute torture.
See also: back, carry, Chinaman, on

Chinaman's chance

Little or no chance at all; a completely hopeless prospect. This derogatory phrase originated in the 1800s and referred to Chinese immigrants who worked for extremely low wages, faced racism and higher taxation, and were prohibited from testifying in court for violence committed against them. Primarily heard in US, South Africa.
See also: chance

Chinaman's chance

Also, ghost of a chance. An extremely slim chance, a hopeless undertaking. Both versions are most often put negatively, as in He hasn't a Chinaman's chance of finishing the work in time, or They haven't a ghost of a chance to get as far as the playoffs. The first term, now considered offensive, dates from the late 1800s when many Chinese immigrants came to work in California and were resented because they worked for lower wages. Its precise allusion is unclear. The variant, which relies on the meaning of ghost as an insubstantial shadow, dates from the mid-1800s. Also see the synonyms fat chance; not an earthly chance.
See also: chance

not a Chinaman's chance

Also, not a ghost of a chance. See under Chinaman's chance.
See also: chance, not

not a Chinaman's chance

not even a very slight chance.
1952 Frank Yerby A Woman Called Fancy You haven't a Chinaman's chance of raising that money in Boston.
See also: chance, not

Chinaman's chance

Slim to no possibility. There have been several explanations about the origin of this odious phrase, all arising from Chinese immigrants working in the American West. One is that they were given the most dangerous jobs, such as setting and igniting explosives. Another is that judges and juries routinely convicted Chinese defendants on the flimsiest of evidence. A third is that Chinese miners were allowed to work gold claims only after others had taken the best ore. In any event, “Chinaman's chance” should be relegated to the slag heap.
See also: chance
References in periodicals archive ?
CLOSE UP: Joseph Fallowell and Olivia Holmes in Sure Thing UNWANTED ATTENTION: Jon Elves and Rebecca Fenlon in Chinamen
29) "Troublesome Chinese: A West Rand Outrage, Miner's House Attacked, Nine Chinamen Arrested," The Rand Daily Mail (Johannesburg), 12 December 1905, p.
Chinamen jump with a thump On the Jotunheimen, while the Sierra Morena blushes In the evening, powdering its breasts with could.
And he will probably try and put together a consortium of Chinamen to buy the club again but I do not believe they would do a better job than we are doing, and I think the club would be bankrupt within a year if they came in.
Popular cartoons showed a very large Columbia or Uncle Sam or a GI giving a helping hand or showing a light or a path to small, childlike Filipinos or Latinos or Chinamen.
A suspicion of foul play thus hung in the air, but nevertheless, Magnus was evidently inspired to play the prank once he read the description of the missing Chinese man and learned that a reward of twenty-five pounds was offered for information: 'I said that we could make a good imitation of him and set the other Chinamen running for the reward'.
philosopher is devoured by Chinamen and caterpillars.
Evidence of mistaken criteria of evaluation can be found in the widespread choice of minor novels such as Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God or Maxine Hong Kingston's Chinamen for introductory courses in American fiction--courses that, one should note, carefully avoid the works of literary traditionalists such as Hawthorne, Melville, Faulkner, O'Connor, or Bellow.
I looked along the shearin' floor before I turned to go--There were eight or ten dashed Chinamen a-shearin' in a row.
These figurative carvings that once enriched the streets of nineteenth-century New York, Boston and countless other cities and towns throughout the USA, depict not only native Americans but also a host of other national types, such as Chinamen and Scottish Highlanders.
For example, Applegarth's 1920 edition of Lamplighters Across the Sea, a collection of stories about the heroics of Bible translators, contained references to "petrified Chinamen," "The blackest little girl you ever saw," and "The wise(?
Sung to the tune of "We Are the World," the song included tasteless lines like "There were Africans drowning, little Chinamen swept away.
In 1942 Poon Lira answered the British call for Chinamen to serve on merchant ships.
After that, on what was a dry Edgbaston pitch, Warwickshire's slower bowlers - off-spinner Wagh and Brad Hogg's slow left-arm chinamen - had a massive impact as Glamorgan slumped form 211-4 to 237-9 inside six overs.
He noted that the intercepted correspondence "indicate[d] a remarkable desire to prevent this movement" and claimed to have seen "translations of several letters urging prominent Canadian Chinamen to endeavor to induce the coollies en route to desert.