Chinaman


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have a Chinaman on (one's) back

To suffer from an addiction to narcotics or the withdrawal symptoms caused by it. A derogatory phrase, it likely refers to opium's classical association with Southeast Asia. Having that Chinaman on her back has kept Janet out of work for years. I want to get clean and turn my life around, but having this Chinaman on my back is absolute torture.
See also: back, Chinaman, have, on

have a Chinaman at (one's) neck

To suffer from an addiction to narcotics or the withdrawal symptoms caused by it. A derogatory phrase, it likely refers to opium's classical association with Southeast Asia. Having that Chinaman at her neck has kept Janet out of work for years. I want to get clean and turn my life around, but having this Chinaman at my neck is absolute torture.
See also: Chinaman, have, neck

carry a Chinaman on (one's) back

To suffer from an addiction to narcotics or the withdrawal symptoms caused by it. A derogatory phrase, it likely refers to opium's classical association with Southeast Asia. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Carrying that Chinaman on her back has kept Janet out of work for years. I want to get clean and turn my life around, but carrying this Chinaman on my back is absolute torture.
See also: back, carry, Chinaman, on

Chinaman's chance

Little or no chance at all; a completely hopeless prospect. This derogatory phrase originated in the 1800s and referred to Chinese immigrants who worked for extremely low wages, faced racism and higher taxation, and were prohibited from testifying in court for violence committed against them. Primarily heard in US, South Africa.
See also: chance

not a Chinaman's chance

offensive slang, dated Absolutely no chance whatsoever. This racist, derogatory phrase originated in the 1800s and referred to Chinese immigrants who worked for extremely low wages, faced racism and higher taxation, and were prohibited from testifying in court for violence committed against them. "Chinaman" is a racial slur for a Chinese person. Primarily heard in US. A: "They don't have a Chinaman's chance of winning the championship." B: "Grandad! You can't say offensive things like that anymore!"
See also: chance, not

Chinaman's chance

Also, ghost of a chance. An extremely slim chance, a hopeless undertaking. Both versions are most often put negatively, as in He hasn't a Chinaman's chance of finishing the work in time, or They haven't a ghost of a chance to get as far as the playoffs. The first term, now considered offensive, dates from the late 1800s when many Chinese immigrants came to work in California and were resented because they worked for lower wages. Its precise allusion is unclear. The variant, which relies on the meaning of ghost as an insubstantial shadow, dates from the mid-1800s. Also see the synonyms fat chance; not an earthly chance.
See also: chance

not a Chinaman's chance

Also, not a ghost of a chance. See under Chinaman's chance.
See also: chance, not

not a Chinaman's chance

not even a very slight chance.
1952 Frank Yerby A Woman Called Fancy You haven't a Chinaman's chance of raising that money in Boston.
See also: chance, not

Chinaman's chance, he hasn't a/not a

No chance whatever. The term dates from the latter half of the nineteenth century, when Chinese immigrants came to California to help build railroads. Their presence was sharply opposed because they would work for far less than white workers. “We are ruined by cheap labor,” wrote Bret Harte in his poem “Plain Language from Truthful James.” According to some authorities, the term applied to those Chinese who tried to supplement their earnings by working claims and streams abandoned by gold prospectors, a virtually hopeless undertaking. Others, poet John Ciardi among them, believe it derives from the way they were regarded as virtually subhuman and had no legal recourse if, for example, they were robbed, attacked, or otherwise abused. It largely replaced the older not a dog’s chance, at least in America, but is now considered offensive. Also see fat chance; snowball's chance.
See also: he, not

Chinaman's chance

Slim to no possibility. There have been several explanations about the origin of this odious phrase, all arising from Chinese immigrants working in the American West. One is that they were given the most dangerous jobs, such as setting and igniting explosives. Another is that judges and juries routinely convicted Chinese defendants on the flimsiest of evidence. A third is that Chinese miners were allowed to work gold claims only after others had taken the best ore. In any event, “Chinaman's chance” should be relegated to the slag heap.
See also: chance
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Rajkot (Gujarat) [India], Oct 06 (ANI): Kuldeep Yadav achieved yet another milestone on Saturday as he became the first Indian chinaman bowler to claim a five-wicket haul, which he achieved during Day Three of the first Test against West Indies here at the Saurashtra Cricket Association Stadium in Rajkot on Sunday.
By cloaking the "domination" of nature and the concomitant destruction of traditional values in the neutral language of science and technology, "which has to be recognized by a Chinaman as correct" (Weber 1988b: 155), the positivist can disguise his technological vision of the world as a universal one....
Like Shehan Karunatilaka's Chinaman, Tissa Abeysekara's unpublished manuscript won the Gratiaen Prize for Literature, which was established by Michael Ondaatje for Sri Lankan writers.
In the last year the self-parodied "chubby Chinaman" has become the biggest draw in stand-up and his incredible six nights at Cardiff International Arena, to 5,000 punters per night, is a feat that may go unmatched here.
The Chinaman by Friedrich Glauser (Bitter Lemon Press, pounds 9.99).
The call-up comes a year after Zhang Lian-wei became the first Chinaman to play at Augusta National.
Thomas struck nine belligerent boundaries in his 63 before Simon Katich, with his occasionally used 'chinaman', dismissed Croft and David Harrison to ensure there was no escape from the follow-on.
A blue and white porcelain Chinaman discovered in a box of bric-a-brac is expected to fetch thousands of pounds.
The Chelsea striker fell on to the Chinaman's legs and, although he was immediately taken off, the severity of his injury was not disclosed until after the game.
The Stretch is written by Stephen Leather, who has penned The Knock and The Chinaman for TV.
While trying to strengthen their batting, India went in with all-rounder Krunal Pandya and stand-in skipper Rohit Sharma will likely opt to select the service of chinaman Kuldeep Yadav, dropping the former.
Summary: New Delhi [India], Aug 23 (ANI): Veteran opening batsman Murali Vijay, along with chinaman Kuldeep Yadav, were axed from the Indian cricket squad for the remaining two Test matches against England, while youngsters Prithvi Shaw and Hanuma Vihari received their maiden call-ups.
The 28- year-old slow left-arm chinaman bowler, who left the tour half-way citing personal reason, has returned though.
The Australian spin wizard, who had a brief session with the chinaman bowler during a Test match in Pune (then coach Anil Kumble had arranged an interaction), is impressed with his ability to create confusion in the minds of Aussie batsmen.