cheque

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a blank cheque

1. Literally, a cheque presented to someone with the amount left blank, so that it can be written out for the desired total. Mom, can you give me a blank cheque so I can fill it out when I buy my school supplies?
2. By extension, the freedom or permission to spend as much money or use as much resources as needed in pursuit of a desire or goal. The company was having a difficult time retaining good employees, so the manager was given a blank cheque to increase salaries and restructure his department. After the fifth murder, the city's police officers were given a blank cheque to use whatever resources they needed in order to find the serial killer before he struck again.
See also: blank, cheque

bad check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored, either because such funds are not available or because the given checking account does not exist. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. A lot of bad checks have been circulating in the area lately, claiming to be from the local university; in reality, they are scams trying to swindle people out of money.
See also: bad, check

bogus check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored, either because such funds are not available or because the given checking account does not exist. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. A lot of bogus checks have been circulating in the area lately, claiming to be from the local university; in reality, they are scams trying to swindle people out of money.
See also: bogus, check

bounced check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored because such funds are not available in the account in question. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. The bank notified me of several bounced checks that my husband has been writing around the country.
See also: bounce, check

cheque is in the mail

Payment (whether or not in the form of a cheque) is en route or will be sent shortly. Often used as an excuse to avoid the pressure of creditors or someone expecting payment for goods or services. Primarily heard in UK, Canada. A: "Mr. Smith, your mortgage payment is now two months overdue." B: "The cheque's in the mail, I promise you!" A: "Can you lend me $40 until I get paid next week?" B: "Sure thing, the cheque's in the mail."
See also: cheque, mail

cold check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored, either because such funds are not available or because the given checking account does not exist. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. A lot of cold checks have been circulating in the area lately, claiming to be from the local university; in reality, they are scams trying to swindle people out of money.
See also: check, cold

fake cheque

1. A written order to a bank that has been forged. Primarily heard in UK, Canada. A lot of fake cheques have been circulating in the area lately, claiming to be from the local university; in reality, they are scams trying to swindle people out of money.
2. A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored, either because such funds are not available or because the given checking account does not exist. Primarily heard in UK, Canada. My ex-husband has been writing fake cheques all over town to pay for his gambling debt.
See also: cheque, fake

hot check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored, either because such funds are not available or because the given checking account does not exist. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. A lot of hot checks have been circulating in the area lately, claiming to be from the local university; in reality, they are scams trying to swindle people out of money.
See also: check, hot

live paycheck to paycheck

To spend all of the money one earns by or before the next time one is paid, thus saving none or very little in the process. Primarily heard in US. We're already living paycheck to paycheck, so I don't know how we'll manage this sudden increase in our rent.
See also: live, paycheck

rubber check

A check that draws upon a bank account which does not have enough funds to cover the amount. The check is called "rubber" because it "bounces" (i.e., it is not honored because of insufficient funds). Primarily heard in US. The man was finally arrested after years of writing rubber checks to businesses all around the country.
See also: check, rubber

take a rain check

To refuse an offer or invitation but with the hope or promise that it can be postponed to a later date or time. I'm sorry, but I'll have to take a rain check for dinner this Saturday. Would next weekend work for you?
See also: check, rain, take

take a ride to Tyburn

obsolete To go to one's execution, especially by hanging. (From the Anglo-Saxon town of Tyburn, renowned for its practice of capital punishment.) The knave, found guilty of the theft of a loaf of bread, will be taking a ride to Tyburn in a fortnight's time.
See also: ride, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take a rain check

(on something) Go to a rain check (on something).
See also: check, rain, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

rubber check

A check drawn on an account without the funds to pay it, as in He's been handing out rubber checks right and left, but the police have caught up with him . The rubber alludes to the fact that, like rubber, the check "bounces," in this case back from the bank. [Slang; c. 1920]
See also: check, rubber
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a blank cheque

COMMON
1. If you give someone a blank cheque to do something, you give them complete authority to do what they think is best in a difficult situation. Note: `Cheque' is spelled `check' in American English. De Klerk had, in a sense, been given a blank cheque to negotiate the new South Africa. The president was effectively given a blank check to commit the nation to war. Note: This expression is used mainly in talking about politics.
2. If you describe an amount of money as a blank cheque, you mean it is unlimited. Note: `Cheque' is spelled `check' in American English. We are not prepared to write a blank cheque for companies that have run into trouble through poor management. Note: This expression is sometimes used literally to mean that someone gives another person a cheque without an amount of money written on it.
See also: blank, cheque

take a rain check

INFORMAL
If you tell someone you will take a rain check, you are saying that you will not accept their offer now but that you might accept it at a different time. I'm sorry, Mimi, I'm just too exhausted to go out tonight. Could I take a rain check? She says she'd like to take a rain check on it and do it in May. Note: This expression refers to baseball. If a baseball game was cancelled because of rain, people were entitled to see another game by showing their original ticket or receipt. This ticket was called a rain check.
See also: check, rain, take
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

a blank cheque

unlimited scope, especially to spend money.
A blank cheque is literally one in which the amount of money to be paid has not been filled in by the payer.
See also: blank, cheque

take a rain check

said when politely refusing an offer, with the implication that you may take it up at a later date. North American
A rain check is a ticket given to spectators at US sporting events enabling them to claim a refund of their entrance money or gain admission on another occasion if the event is cancelled because of rain. The rain-check system is mentioned as operating in US sports grounds in the late 19th century; the figurative use of the word dates from the early 20th century.
See also: check, rain, take

rubber cheque

a cheque that is returned unpaid. informal humorous
The expression plays on the idea of a cheque that ‘bounces’, or is unpaid because there are insufficient funds in the drawer's account to cover it.
See also: cheque, rubber
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a blank ˈcheque

(British English) (American English a blank ˈcheck) permission to act as you like (especially to spend money) in a particular task or situation: Just because I asked you to speak on my behalf, that didn’t mean you had a blank cheque to promise anything you liked.She was given a blank cheque and told to hire the best singers she could.
See also: blank, cheque

take a ˈrain check (on something)

(informal, especially American English) used to refuse an offer or invitation but to say that you will accept it later: ‘Would you like to try that new restaurant tonight?’ ‘I’m afraid I’m busy tonight, but can I take a rain check?’A rain check was originally a ticket that was given to spectators at an outdoor event if it was cancelled or interrupted by rain. They could then use this ticket at a future event.
See also: check, rain, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

hot check

n. a bad check. The crook got picked up after passing a hot check.
See also: check, hot

rubber (check)

n. a check that bounces; a forged check. (see also bounce.) The bank says I wrote a rubber check, but I’m sure there was enough money on deposit.
See also: check, rubber
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Bounced cheques worth Dh50,000 to Dh100,000: Dh5,000
Cheques processed with the highest value (above QR10mn) fell from 20.9% in 2017 to 17.7% in 2018.
DMBs are required to engage their respective Service Providers to prepare their In-Clearing Application to support the processing of cheques designed in line with the new standard.
Court records showed that the defendants "intentionally wrote" two bad cheques for their former business partner.
Lawyer Ashraf Abdul Razak, who was had been a partner at the firm from 1996 to 2017, said the cheque dated February 2, 2015, was given to him by Habibul Rahman Kadir Shah, a known corporate figure.
The workshop identified proposed improvements to the current cheque verification process, specifically how changes could be made to limit incidences of fraud and support the nation's move towards becoming a cashless society.
Cheques imply trust and credit-worthiness, and those from strangers are generally not readily accepted.Cheques evolved through a truncation process back in 2011 that reduced the clearing period from about four to two working days by allowing banks to exchange images of cheques instead of actual cheques at the central clearinghouse.
The number of rejected cheques in June declined to 94264 against 107797 in May.
In the second half of 2018, all of the UK's banks and building societies will move to the image-based system for clearing cheques.
KFH cordially invites customers to visit any of its branches in order to receive the new Cheques, affirming that it will fully adhere with the new Cheques instructions conformity to Kuwait's system for clearing Electronic Checks standard and reducing the period of Cheques collection from 3 days to the same day according to the case.
According to police sources,land owner Waheed Khan was given a cheque amounting to Rs 1460000 which got dishonoured by concerned bank.
Not only dishonoured cheques, but any action in which a person stops payment of the cheque is perceived as a crime.
The Emirati's lawyer told the court that his client had handed over the blank cheque on the understanding that cheques up to a maximum of Dhs50,000 could be written.
Barclays said it would also shortly be trialling the technology with its corporate clients, offering the potential for businesses to save time and money paying in their customers' cheques to the bank.