cent

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cent

Representing the tiniest amount of money. Used especially in the phrase "last cent." Sorry, I spent every last cent on this new phone, so I'm totally broke until my next payday. We don't have a cent to our names.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cent

n. one dollar. (Underworld.) One cent for one joint? Not bad.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
"Wages will keep on rising, little by little, little by little, as steadily as a tree grows, and at the end of three hundred and forty years more there'll be at least ONE country where the mechanic's average wage will be TWO HUNDRED cents a day!"
"Twenty-five milrays a day; that is to say, a quarter of a cent.
Of course we can't afford to take these structures down under a bonus of five hundred per cent upon the prime cost of our lot and plaster.
Then they were piled upon a truck, and it was Jurgis's task to wheel them to the room where the machines were "assembled." This was child's play for him, and he got a dollar and seventy-five cents a day for it; on Saturday he paid Aniele the seventy-five cents a week he owed her for the use of her garret, and also redeemed his overcoat, which Elzbieta had put in pawn when he was in jail.
So whenever he wished to ride, he had to pay ten cents each way, or over ten per cent of his income to this power, which had gotten its franchises long ago by buying up the city council, in the face of popular clamor amounting almost to a rebellion.
That fireplace--those big stones--I was soft, then, a little, anemic, alcoholic degenerate, with the spunk of a rabbit and about one per cent as much stamina, and some of those big stones nearly broke my back and my heart.
Here is a young fellow that offers to marry his daughter for $30,000--half price, as one may say-- and he talks about covering every cent he lays down with one of my own.
"That Jim Crow there in the window," answered the urchin, holding out a cent, and pointing to the gingerbread figure that had attracted his notice, as he loitered along to school; "the one that has not a broken foot."
"No matter for the cent. You are welcome to Jim Crow."
There are strandings and strandings, but I am safe to say that 90 per cent. of them are occasions in which a sailor, without dishonour, may well wish himself dead; and I have no doubt that of those who had the experience of their ship taking the ground, 90 per cent.