ceiling

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bamboo ceiling

A figurative discriminatory barrier in the workplace that impedes the career progress of Asians and people of Asian descent, preventing them from reaching top leadership positions in a company. Coined by the writer Jane Hyun, it is derived from the term "glass ceiling," which refers to the subtle discriminations that prevent women from advancing to the top positions in business. Mark was worried that his Chinese heritage might result in a bamboo ceiling if he tried to get a promotion down the line.
See also: ceiling

brass ceiling

The barrier of gender bias that makes it difficult for women in the military to advance through the ranks. A play on the phrase "glass ceiling," which refers to the same difficulty for women in the workplace in general. I can't stand this brass ceiling—if I were a man, I'd be a corporal by now.
See also: brass, ceiling

glass ceiling

A societal barrier that prevents women and minorities from advancing in the workplace. Many people believe that a glass ceiling exists within the tech industry because not many women hold prominent positions in the field.
See also: ceiling, glass

go through the roof

 
1. Fig. Inf. to become very angry. She saw what had happened and went through the roof. My father went through the roof when he saw what I did to the car.
2. Fig. Inf. [for prices] to become very high. These days, prices for gasoline are going through the roof. The cost of coffee is going through the roof.
See also: roof, through

hit the ceiling

 and hit the roof
Fig. to get very angry. She really hit the ceiling when she found out what happened. My dad'll hit the roof when he finds out that I wrecked his car.
See also: ceiling, hit

glass ceiling

An unacknowledged discriminatory barrier to advancement, especially for women and minorities. For example, Harriet knew she'd never be promoted-she would never get through the glass ceiling. [1980s]
See also: ceiling, glass

go through the roof

1. Also, hit the ceiling or roof . Lose one's temper, become very angry, as in Marge went through the roof when she heard she'd been fired. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
2. Reach new or unexpected heights, as in After the war, food prices went through the roof. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
See also: roof, through

hit the ceiling

Also, hit the roof. Explode in anger, as in Jane hit the ceiling when she saw her grades, or Dad hit the roof when he didn't get his usual bonus. The first expression dates from the early 1900s; the second is a version of a 16th-century locution, up in the house roof or house-top, meaning "enraged."
See also: ceiling, hit

go through the ceiling

COMMON If the level of something goes through the ceiling, it increases by a lot very rapidly. Sales went through the ceiling and pharmacists began reporting shortages of the drug. Compare with go through the roof.
See also: ceiling, through

hit the ceiling

COMMON If someone hits the ceiling, they suddenly become very angry and shout at someone. When I told him what happened, he hit the ceiling. Compare with hit the roof.
See also: ceiling, hit

the glass ceiling

COMMON If you talk about the glass ceiling, you mean the opinions and attitudes which prevent people, especially women, from being given the most important jobs. At the age of 43 she became the highest ranking woman officer in the country, only to find she'd hit the glass ceiling. A woman judge has at last succeeded in breaking through the glass ceiling into the Court of Appeal, the second highest court in the land.
See also: ceiling, glass

go through the roof

or

hit the roof

COMMON
1. If the level of something goes through the roof or hits the roof, it increases by a lot very rapidly. Interest rates were going through the roof. In 1990, wool prices hit the roof. Compare with go through the ceiling.
2. If someone goes through the roof or hits the roof, they suddenly become very angry, and usually show their anger by shouting at someone. When I told my mother she went through the roof. She took one look at my hair and hit the roof. Compare with go through the ceiling. Compare with hit the ceiling.
See also: roof, through

hit the ceiling

and hit the roof
tv. to get very angry. She really hit the ceiling when she found out what happened.
See also: ceiling, hit

go through the roof

Slang
1. To grow, intensify, or rise to an enormous, often unexpected degree: Operating costs went through the roof last year.
2. To become extremely angry: When I told her about breaking the window, she went through the roof.
See also: roof, through
References in classic literature ?
Again he commenced his groping advance; but this time he had gone but a short distance when he emerged into a room, which was lighted through an opening in the ceiling, from which a flight of concrete steps led downward to the floor of the chamber.
When he was able, he rose, and leaned close over the Wieroo, lying silent and motionless, his wings dropping limply and his great, round eyes staring blankly toward the ceiling.
In one corner was a pile of human skulls reaching almost to the ceiling and in another a stack of dried Wieroo wings.
I saw (or fancied I saw, in the ob scurity) a long room with a low ceiling.
Yes,' rejoined Mr Folair, looking round for an instant, and immediately carrying his eyes back again to the ceiling.
Monsieur Stangerson," he said, "tells us that the two bullets have been found in The Yellow Room, one embedded in the wall stained with the impression of a red hand--a man's large hand --and the other in the ceiling.
Because she bravely faced the murderer; because she courageously defended herself--and, above all, because of the bullet in the ceiling.
with that, he winked as if in preservation of some deep secret, and folding his arms and leaning back in his chair, looked up at the ceiling with profound gravity.
With all these personal advantages (to which may be added a strong savour of tobacco-smoke, and a prevailing greasiness of appearance) Mr Swiveller leant back in his chair with his eyes fixed on the ceiling, and occasionally pitching his voice to the needful key, obliged the company with a few bars of an intensely dismal air, and then, in the middle of a note, relapsed into his former silence.
The silence was not of long duration, for Mr Swiveller, after favouring us with several melodious assurances that his heart was in the Highlands, and that he wanted but his Arab steed as a preliminary to the achievement of great feats of valour and loyalty, removed his eyes from the ceiling and subsided into prose again.
Creating new products designed for acoustics in today's flexible interiors takes on new importance as traditional acoustical recommendations are not always compatible with current design trends," states Jeff Hederick, Armstrong Vice President of Marketing for Commercial Ceilings.
Here's how to fix them up: Ceilings get stained by things like water leaks, candles, light bulbs, and smoke from real wood fires.
Global Banking News-July 14, 2015--Vietnam central bank lifts ceiling for lending
Walls may get some attention if there is an obvious stain, and ceilings are generally ignored.
Originally developed to hide the underside of the floor above and to provide sound attenuation within a room, they generally consist of grids suspended from concrete ceilings by wires and holding a variety of tiles and light fittings.