castle

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build castles in the sky

To create dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—don't just build castles in the sky.
See also: build, castle, sky

build castles in Spain

To create dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—don't just build castles in Spain.
See also: build, castle, Spain

castles in the sky

Dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. He keeps talking about how he'll move to Los Angeles to be a famous actor, but it's just castles in the sky if you ask me. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—it can't be all castles in the sky.
See also: castle, sky

castles in Spain

Dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. He keeps talking about how he'll move to Los Angeles to be a famous actor, but it's just castles in Spain if you ask me. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—it can't be all castles in Spain.
See also: castle, Spain

castle in the air

A hope or wish, especially for one's life, that is unlikely to come true. A daydream. I really want to become a famous Hollywood actor, but I realize that it's just a castle in the air and that I shouldn't quit my day job.
See also: air, castle

an Englishman's home is his castle

One should be the sole person in control of one's home and the happenings there. Primarily heard in UK. I vehemently oppose any laws that dictate how I behave in the privacy of my own home. An Englishman's home is his castle!
See also: castle, home

build castles in the air

To create dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—don't just build castles in the air.
See also: air, build, castle

castles in the air

Dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—don't just build castles in the air. He keeps talking about how he'll move to Los Angeles to be a famous actor, but it's just castles in the air if you ask me.
See also: air, castle

king of the castle

The most powerful, successful, or authoritative person in a group or organization. Primarily heard in UK, Ireland. After years of slowly moving up the ranks, Joe finally became king of the castle in his office. This team will be hard to beat, reigning as king of the castle for three years straight.
See also: castle, king, of

build castles in the air

 and build castles in Spain
Fig. to daydream; to make plans that can never come true. Ann spends most of her time building castles in Spain. I really like to sit on the porch in the evening, just building castles in the air.
See also: air, build, castle

man's home is his castle

Prov. Cliché One can do whatever one wants to in one's own home. Don't tell me not to go around the house in my underwear. A man's home is his castle. I'll play my radio loud if I want to. A man's home is his castle.
See also: castle, home

castles in the air

Also, castles in Spain. Dreams about future success, as in Musing about the bestseller list, she was apt to build castles in the air. The first term dates from the late 1500s. The variant, castles in Spain (or chateaux en Espagne), was recorded in the Roman de la Rose in the 13th century and translated into English about 1365.
See also: air, castle

castles in the air

If you describe someone's plans as castles in the air, you mean that they are not realistic and have no chance of succeeding. `Along the way, I intend to become very rich.' He shook his head in wonder at her. `You're building castles in the air, Anne.' This could be seen as an admission that Carter's election promises were just castles in the air.
See also: air, castle

an Englishman's home is his castle

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
When people say an Englishman's home is his castle, they mean that British people believe they have the right to do what they want in their own home, and that other people or the state should not interfere in their private lives. He clearly holds a view that an Englishman's home is his castle and he is entitled to take any steps necessary to secure that.
See also: castle, home
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