carriage

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horse and buggy

 and horse and carriage; buggy whip
Fig. a carriage pulled by a horse, as opposed to a modern automobile; the horse was urged on with a whip. (A symbol of old-fashionedness or out-of-dateness. Particularly with go out with, as in the examples.) That kind of clothing went out with the horse and buggy. I thought suspenders went out with the horse and carriage, but I see them everywhere now.
See also: and, buggy, horse

carriage trade

The best customers. Restaurants, stores, and other establishments were especially pleased to serve wealthy customers who arrived and departed in their own private horse and carriage, as distinguished from people who came and went by foot or public transportation. It was the purchasing power of the carriage trade that produced a reaction from the establishment's personnel that was solicitous to the point of obsequiousness.
See also: carriage, trade
References in classic literature ?
But the coachman could not stop, for from the Meshchanski Street came more carts and carriages, and the Rostovs were being shouted at to move on and not block the way.
He approached the carriage, and delivered his message gallantly and intelligently.
Her hand remained in his, and as the carriage lurched across the gang-plank onto the ferry he bent over, unbuttoned her tight brown glove, and kissed her palm as if he had kissed a relic.
At the sound of the fireworks the carriages instantly broke ranks, and retired by the adjacent streets.
On entering the carriage, Julia noticed the eye of Antonio fixed on her with peculiar meaning, and she felt that her conduct had been appreciated.
The major noticed at a distance of some two hundred yards the remains of another bridge intended for carriages and destroyed the day before.
The porter at the palace was about to close the gates, but seeing such a handsome equipage he fancied that it was some visit of importance and the carriage was allowed to pass and to stop beneath the porch.
He stooped a little, and with his tattered blue cap pointed under the carriage.
The carriage lamps shed a yellow light on a rough-looking road which seemed to be cut through bushes and low-growing things which ended in the great expanse of dark apparently spread out before and around them.
added aloud the man who alighted from the carriage.
These new-comers evidently meant mischief with regard to the carriage.
The old butler who had traveled with the countess, came to the carriage to announce that everything was ready, and the countess got up to go.
Chanticleer observing that they were but thin fellows, and not likely to take up much room, told them they might ride, but made them promise not to dirty the wheels of the carriage in getting in, nor to tread on Partlet's toes.
Sedley had taken an hysterical adieu of her daughter, the pair went off to the carriage.
Ginger was never put into the carriage again, but when she was well of her bruises one of the Lord W 's younger sons said he should like to have her; he was sure she would make a good hunter.