carriage

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horse and buggy

 and horse and carriage; buggy whip
Fig. a carriage pulled by a horse, as opposed to a modern automobile; the horse was urged on with a whip. (A symbol of old-fashionedness or out-of-dateness. Particularly with go out with, as in the examples.) That kind of clothing went out with the horse and buggy. I thought suspenders went out with the horse and carriage, but I see them everywhere now.
See also: and, buggy, horse

carriage trade

The best customers. Restaurants, stores, and other establishments were especially pleased to serve wealthy customers who arrived and departed in their own private horse and carriage, as distinguished from people who came and went by foot or public transportation. It was the purchasing power of the carriage trade that produced a reaction from the establishment's personnel that was solicitous to the point of obsequiousness.
See also: carriage, trade
References in classic literature ?
They arrived, the carriage turned, the step was let down, and Mr.
With a wild rattle and clatter, and an inhuman abandonment of consideration not easy to be understood in these days, the carriage dashed through streets and swept round corners, with women screaming before it, and men clutching each other and clutching children out of its way.
At a few steps distant from the vehicle he now found a company of some thirty stragglers collected around an immense fire, which they were feeding with planks, caisson covers, wheels, and broken carriages.
From two o'clock till five Franz and Albert followed in the fete, exchanging handfuls of confetti with the other carriages and the pedestrians, who crowded amongst the horses' feet and the carriage wheels without a single accident, a single dispute, or a single fight.
The soldiers, pushed back by these living walls, were in danger of being crushed against the spokes of the wheels and the panels of the carriages.
Here, Anthony," said Charles, "Miss Emmerson has sent you ten dollars, for driving so well, and saving the carriage.
Will your majesty deign to give me some description of the carriage I am charged to discover?
In his senseless school-boy happiness he pictured Madame Olenska's descent from the train, his discovery of her a long way off, among the throngs of meaningless faces, her clinging to his arm as he guided her to the carriage, their slow approach to the wharf among slipping horses, laden carts, vociferating teamsters, and then the startling quiet of the ferry-boat, where they would sit side by side under the snow, in the motionless carriage, while the earth seemed to glide away under them, rolling to the other side of the sun.
The horses were in waiting, making each rusty spring reverberate the carriage again with their impatience.
At a quarter past ten they at last got into their carriages and started.
They had lunch at Richmond and then walked to Twickenham, where they had sent the carriage.
Mary saw that it was a smart carriage and that it was a smart footman who helped her in.
I suspect," said he, "a tall, dark man, of lofty carriage, who has the air of a great lord.
So Chanticleer began to build a little carriage of nutshells: and when it was finished, Partlet jumped into it and sat down, and bid Chanticleer harness himself to it and draw her home.
Yes,' answered I; internally adding, 'and I thought it somewhat derogatory to his dignity as a clergyman to come flying from the pulpit in such eager haste to shake hands with the squire, and hand his wife and daughters into their carriage: and, moreover, I owe him a grudge for nearly shutting me out of it'; for, in fact, though I was standing before his face, close beside the carriage steps, waiting to get in, he would persist in putting them up and closing the door, till one of the family stopped him by calling out that the governess was not in yet; then, without a word of apology, he departed, wishing them good-morning, and leaving the footman to finish the business.