care of (someone)

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care of (someone)

At someone else's mailing address. This phrase is typically written on a package or letter. You can just send my Christmas card care of my aunt because I'll be staying at her place for the holidays.
See also: care, of

ˈcare of somebody

(American English also in ˈcare of somebody) used when writing to somebody at another person’s address: Write to me care of my sister, because I’ll be touring Africa for six months.
This expression is usually written as ‘c/o’ on envelopes.
See also: care, of, somebody
References in periodicals archive ?
Walsh wrote of the plight of the needy aged: "With regard to this problem--the care of the aged poor--I may say at once that our present mode of caring for them [in 1916] is almost barbarous.
The managed care movement has not only influenced the care of the membership it has attracted over the years, but has also affected the care of all Americans through a multitude of health care delivery breakthroughs and applications.
1985 Alzheimer's Association partnered with American Health Care Association to write a manual, Care of Alzheimer's Patients: A Manual for Nursing Home Staff
According to Sandra Smith Goss, a long-term care consultant with SubAcute Care of America in San Diego, whatever else facilities may think of PPS, there is one way to look at it positively, i.
Take Care Health's vision to combine best practices in medicine and the expertise and personal care of Take Care Nurse Practitioners (TCNPs) with world-class customer service is filling a critical need in America by providing easy access to health care.
Some physicians who go into specialties like diabetes or cardiovascular hypertension are going to be appropriately taking care of some patients as their primary care patients.
Long-term care providers know more about the elderly and how to take care of them than any other part of the health care system, including HMOs.
Kassirer succinctly summarizes this admonition: "These companies can survive, if (they) show that they care about more than profits, that they do not skimp on care, that they support their just share of teaching, research, and the care of the poor, that they no longer muzzle physicians, and that they offer something special (including controlling costs) by managing care.
Services should relate to the care of people with chronic diseases and disabilities throughout their natural progression.
Finally, Zarling et al compared a large number of patients admitted to the hospital with acute diverticulitis under the care of internists, family practitioners, and gastroenterologists.
Take Care's vision is to combine best practices in medicine and the expertise and personal care of Take Care Nurse Practitioners with world-class customer service, filling a critical need in America by providing easy access to healthcare.
Our RN staff participated in a leadership series that emphasized their role as "Partners in Care" (PIC) team leaders who direct the care of residents in collaboration with nursing assistants, therapists, physicians, and social service, nutritional and activity staff.
There is a separate system for care of the governing, academic, managerial, and scientific elites.
For payors, subacute care has become increasingly important as a proactive method of managing the costs and care of medically complex patients.