capital

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make capital out of (something)

To use something to one's advantage or profit. Prosecutors are making capital out of the defendant's conflicting stories.
See also: capital, make, of, out

with a capital (some letter)

1. In the most extreme form or degree. I am hungry with a capital H! Let's eat! No, it's not an emergency with a capital E. I can wait until the end of the day.
2. In the most typical, formal, or traditional form. When he talks about photography, he means with a capital P. He would never think to consider pictures taken on smartphones. Well, it's not literature with a capital L, but it's still a good story.
See also: capital

make capital out of

Use profitably, turn to account, as in The challengers made capital out of the President's signing a bill that increased taxes . This expression, first recorded in 1855, uses capital in the sense of "material wealth used to create more wealth."
See also: capital, make, of, out

with a capital A/B/C, etc.

COMMON
1. You say with a capital A/B/C, etc. to mean that something has a particular quality to a great extent. You mark my words, that man's Trouble with a capital `T'.
2. You say with a capital A/B/C, etc. to mean that a particular idea or concept is being understood in only the strictest sense. The British tend to see things in terms of principles with a capital P. This is art with a capital A. Note: This sense is often used slightly disapprovingly, to suggest that someone is taking something too seriously.
See also: capital

with a capital —

used to give emphasis to the word or concept in question.
1991 Nesta Wyn Ellis John Major He is not a personality with a capital P, not flamboyant, not it seems an angry man.
See also: capital

make ˈcapital of/out of something

use a situation or an event in a way which benefits yourself; exploit something: The media made great capital out of his careless remarks in the interview.
See also: capital, make, of, out, something

with a capital ˈA, ˈB, ˈC, etc.

used to emphasize that a word has a stronger meaning in a particular situation; very: When I say he’s boring, I mean boring with a capital B!
See also: capital

capital

n. cash; money. I’m a little short of capital right now.
References in classic literature ?
But, in spite of Rawdon's undoubted skill and constant successes, it became evident to Rebecca, considering these things, that their position was but a precarious one, and that, even although they paid scarcely anybody, their little capital would end one day by dwindling into zero.
The day after he reached his capital the Sultan assembled his court and told them all that had befallen him, and told them how he intended to adopt the young king as his heir.
You perceive," said he, "that the labors of this savant have been conducted with great precision; we are moving directly toward the Loggoum region, and perhaps toward Kernak, its capital.
When there is only so much of the same thing, and when two men want all they can get of the same thing, there is a conflict of interest between labor and capital.
For the same reason, the parents will have to sell the younger son into bondage or the ranks of the army, in order that he may earn more towards the family capital.
To describe this growth in a single sentence, we might say that the Bell telephone secured its first million of capital in 1879; its first million of earnings in 1882; its first million of dividends in 1884; its first million of surplus in 1885.
capital, is developed, in the same proportion is the proletariat, the modern working class, developed -- a class of labourers, who live only so long as they find work, and who find work only so long as their labour increases capital.
Count Rostopchin was telling a fourth group that he was prepared to die with the city train bands under the walls of the capital, but that he still could not help regretting having been left in ignorance of what was happening, and that had he known it sooner things would have been different.
His capital and resources had by this time greatly augmented, and he had risen from small beginnings to take his place among the first merchants and financiers of the country.
Is it possible," exclaimed Albert, "that you have reached your present age without visiting the finest capital in the world?