cancer stick

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Related to Cancer: lung cancer, Cancer treatment

cancer stick

slang A cigarette. You'll probably find Ed outside smoking a cancer stick.
See also: stick

cancer stick

n. a tobacco cigarette. (From the notion that cigarette smoking is a major cause of lung cancer. Old but recurrent.) Kelly pulled out his ninth cancer stick and lit it up.
See also: stick
References in periodicals archive ?
Like Repasky, Joan Bull of the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston is using full-body heat to treat cancer. Her team has found that warming people to feverlike temperatures seems to amplify the effects of chemotherapy.
Coffey and his colleagues, including DeWeese and Robert Getzenberg of Johns Hopkins, are trying a more targeted approach: heating cancer cells from the inside out.
Delayed diagnosis and elevated mortality in an urban population with HIV and lung cancer: Implications for patient care.
Survival of patients with stage I lung cancer detected on CT screening.
Budwig who have pursued cancer remedies and come up with remarkable natural formulas and diets that work for hundreds and thousands of patients.
She noted that every cancer sample analyzed (whether human or other animal) contained it.
The Japanese market for cancer drugs is huge: about JPY526bn (US$4.58bn) per year.
It's no wonder then that Japan has become a hot bed for cancer remedy start-ups, offering everything from nanotech and broccoli sprout powder to new immunotherapy methods.
Free radicals cause cancer. Antioxidants can quench or capture free radicals.
New treatment options, solid research and women willing to participate in clinical trials to identify better ways of screening, diagnosing and treating the disease have led to a significant drop in the breast cancer death rate in recent years, even though the incidence remains about the same.
Overall cancer incidence increased 48 percent between 1950 and 1990, according to the National Cancer Institute.
Preliminary results from three Phase 1 clinical trials show that OGX-011 is well tolerated, achieves excellent drug concentrations in prostate tissue, and produces a 91 percent dose-dependent down-regulation of clusterin in prostate cancer cells removed from prostate cancer patients.
Analyses controlling for study site, duration of pill use, parity, age, sterilization and family history of ovarian cancer confirmed that women with a history of endometriosis had a higher risk of ovarian cancer than women with no such history (odds ratio, 1.3).
The good news is that more women are now being diagnosed early, when the disease is more easily treatable; options for treatment have improved; and many more women survive breast cancer than die from it.
The United Kingdom census (Quinn, Babb, Brock, Kirby, & Jones, 2001) identified around 1,400 cases of testicular cancer in 1997, forming just over 1% of all male cancer.