cancer stick

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Related to Cancer: lung cancer, Cancer treatment

cancer stick

n. a tobacco cigarette. (From the notion that cigarette smoking is a major cause of lung cancer. Old but recurrent.) Kelly pulled out his ninth cancer stick and lit it up.
See also: stick
References in periodicals archive ?
Her case is among those marking the transition from cancer as a terminal disease to a chronic one.
Metastatic cancer is a returning cancer that spreads primarily into four areas: the brain, lungs, bones and liver.
By simply ratcheting up a tumor's temperature a few degrees--similar to the tiny temperature difference between the testes and the rest of a man's body--scientists are boosting the power of radiation, chemotherapy, and cancer vaccines.
HEATING UP The idea of prescribing heat, or hyperthermia, to cure whatever ails you spans hundreds of years, says cancer researcher Donald Coffey of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
Budwig who have pursued cancer remedies and come up with remarkable natural formulas and diets that work for hundreds and thousands of patients.
She noted that every cancer sample analyzed (whether human or other animal) contained it.
Then, of course, there is the matter of big business, and cancer treatment in Japan is certainly big business.
Kirk, CEO of the support and advocacy group, Y-ME National Breast Cancer Organization.
This study will provide data on the ability of OGX-011 to enhance the activity of hormone ablation therapy in prostate cancer.
If we could persuade everyone to stop smoking, lung cancer rates would drop by 90 percent.
A much more limited inquiry into chemical exposures as breast cancer risk factors provides a new hypothesis for study: Laboratory animal and cell studies support the hypothesis that animal mammary carcinogens and chemicals that mimic estrogen or otherwise disrupt hormones may increase breast cancer risk, just as endogenous and pharmaceutical hormones do (Brody and Rudel 2003; Davis et al.
Although commonly considered a single disease, cancer is a term that is used to describe more than two hundred different diseases (Nezu, Nezu, Friedman, Faddis, & Houts, 1998).
Among women, since 1989, overall cancer incidence rates have risen slightly (due largely to lung cancer and breast cancer) and death rates have declined slightly.
During an average period of almost three years, invasive breast cancer was diagnosed in 9,364 women.
The evidence Is very strong for a number of cancer sites," says Walter Willett, who chairs the nutrition department at the Harvard School of Public Health.