camp

(redirected from Camp Walter Chauncey)
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boot camp

1. A camp where military recruits are rigorously trained in combat, physical fitness, military drills, etc. The military always sounded like a romantic career, but boot camp nearly killed me!
2. A training camp for juvenile offenders or troublesome adolescents modeled after military basic training, meant to instill socially acceptable values and behaviors through rigorous disciplinary, physical, and psychological exercises. Our son was out of control for several years, but after he came back from boot camp, it was like he was a whole new person.
3. Any training camp or course that teaches by means of an intensive and immersive environment. I hear that the computer programming boot camp is full-on, but that you'll come away from it with comprehensive skills in the field.
See also: boot, camp

camp follower

1. A civilian who follows a military unit from one location to the next, either because the person is closely related to a service member or to unofficially provide goods or services to members of the unit. Daniel spent his childhood as a camp follower. His father was in the army, so he and his mother had to move a lot.
2. A person who supports a group or cause without officially belonging to its organization. I always vote Republican, but I'm a camp follower—I'm registered as an Independent.
See also: camp, follower

break camp

To pack up one's belongings and leave a campsite. We need to break camp and head back to town before nightfall.
See also: break, camp

camp it up

1. To act in a campy (exaggerated, racy, or tacky) manner, often in a theatrical setting. I know your character is supposed to add comic relief, but you don't have to camp it up that much.
2. To act in an overly effeminate manner, as of a gay man. I highly doubt that every man who camps it up is gay.
See also: camp, up

camp out

1. To sleep outside recreationally; to camp, typically with a sleeping bag and/or tent. My little brother really wants to camp out for his birthday, so we're going to set up a tent in our backyard for him. I love hiking and camping out, but my boyfriend is not very outdoorsy.
2. To live in a place other than one home's temporarily, often in conditions that are not ideal. I'm camping out in my aunt's basement until I can move into my new apartment, so my roommates right now are a washer and dryer—and a few bugs.
See also: camp, out

have a foot in both camps

To have some involvement with or support for two opposing sides. When my friends split up, I felt like I had a foot in both camps. I've worked with both teams, and I think they both have good ideas, so to be honest I have a foot in both camps.
See also: both, camp, foot, have

break camp

to close down a campsite; to pack up and move on. Early this morning we broke camp and moved on northward. Okay, everyone. It's time to break camp. Take those tents down and fold them neatly.
See also: break, camp

camp it up

[for performers] to overact or behave in an affected manner. The cast began to camp it up in the second act, and the critics walked out. (Fixed order.) There is no need to camp it up. Play it the way it was written.
See also: camp, up

camp out

to live out of doors temporarily in a tent or camping vehicle, as on a vacation or special camping trip. I love to camp out in the winter.
See also: camp, out

*foot in both camps

Fig. an interest in or to support each of two opposing groups of people. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~.) The shop steward had been promised a promotion and so had a foot in both camps during the strike—workers and management. Mr. Smith has a foot in both camps in the parent-teacher dispute. He teaches math, but he has a son at the school.
See also: both, camp, foot

*in the boondocks

 and *in the boonies
in a rural area; far away from a city or population. (*Typically: be ~; camp ~; live ~; stay ~.) Perry lives out in the boonies with his parents.

pitch camp

to set up or arrange a campsite. We pitched camp near the stream. Two campers went ahead of us to pitch camp while it was still light.
See also: camp, pitch

break camp

Take down a tent and pack up other gear; also, leave a place, move out. For example, The landlord has to return my rent deposit before I'll break camp. Originally camp denoted a military encampment, but by the mid-1500s the term had been transferred to temporary outdoor sites used by hunters and the like. By the 19th century, the current term was in use. Thus, "It is the hunter's rule to see that the fire is extinguished ... before breaking camp." (F.H. Guillemard, Cruise of Marchesa I, 1886).
See also: break, camp

camp follower

1. A civilian who follows or settles near a military camp, especially a prostitute who does so. For example, The recruits were told not to associate with camp followers. [Early 1800s]
2. A person who sympathizes with a cause or group but does not join it. For example, She's only a camp follower so we can't count on her for a contribution.
See also: camp, follower

camp it up

Make an extravagant, affected, or vulgar display, as in Amateur actors often camp it up, trying to be more dramatic. Originating in the 1950s as slang for flamboyant behavior stereotypically associated with gay men, this term began to be used more loosely by about 1970. Also see ham it up.
See also: camp, up

camp out

Sleep outdoors; also, stay somewhere for an unusually long time. For example, "We camped out in a field this night" (George Washington, Journal, March 18, 1748). In the early 1900s, the expression was extended to figurative uses, meaning simply "to stay somewhere for an unusually long time," as in She camped out at the stage door, hoping for an autograph.
See also: camp, out

foot in both camps, have a

Support or have good relations with two opposing sides. For example, He had a foot in both camps, making donations to candidates in both parties. In this expression camp alludes to encampments of enemy troops in a battle. [First half of 1900s]
See also: both, foot, have

a camp follower

You call someone a camp follower when they follow or spend time with a particular person or group, either because they admire or support them, or because they hope to gain advantages from them. Brecht was surrounded by `camp-followers' — crowds of women who seemed to adore him. Even in my day as a player, we had our camp followers. Note: This expression is often used to show disapproval. Note: Originally, camp followers were civilians who travelled with an army and who made their living selling goods or services to the soldiers.
See also: camp, follower

pitch camp

If someone pitches camp, they settle somewhere for a period. As the scandal broke, reporters pitched camp outside the family home in Faversham.
See also: camp, pitch

a foot in both camps

If someone has a foot in both camps, they support or belong to two different groups, often groups with different aims or opinions. With an Indian father and an English mother, she had a foot in both camps — or perhaps in neither. Note: You can also say that someone has a foot in each camp or one foot in each camp. Sagdeev is trying to promote a compromise because he has one foot in each camp. Note: In this expression, a camp is a place where an army has put up its tents during part of a war or battle.
See also: both, camp, foot

camp out

v.
1. To sleep outdoors, usually in a tent: If the weather is nice, we should camp out on the mountain.
2. To reside at some place temporarily, especially under difficult conditions: I had to camp out in my cousin's living room until I found an apartment of my own.
See also: camp, out

camp

1. n. something cute and out of fashion; something of such an anachronistic style as to be intriguing. Nobody really knows what style camp really is, and very few even care.
2. and campy mod. overdone; out of fashion and intriguing. Most camp entertainment is pretentious and overdrawn.
3. mod. having to do with homosexual persons and matters. She is so camp, I could scream!

camp it up

1. tv. to overact. Can you make it a little more lively without camping it up?
2. tv. to overdo effeminacy; [for a homosexual male] to act too effeminate in public. John just loves to burst into the most sedate hotel in town and camp it up in the lobby.
See also: camp, up

break camp

To pack up equipment and leave a campsite.
See also: break, camp
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