camel

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camel through the eye of a needle

Used as part of a comparison to indicate that something is impossible or extremely difficult to accomplish. Taken from the passage in the Bible (Luke 18:25), "For it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God." You'd have an easier time getting a camel through the eye of a needle than getting them to agree on the issue.
See also: camel, eye, needle, of, through

a camel's nose (under the tent)

A small, seemingly innocuous act or decision that will lead to much larger, more serious, and less desirable consequences down the line. The term refers to an alleged Arab proverb that if a camel is allowed to get its nose inside of a tent, it will be impossible to prevent the rest of it from entering. Some regard legalizing same-sex marriage as a camel's nose under the tent, eventually leading to the destruction of marriage altogether. Not hiring an exterminator at the first sign of termites has proved to be a camel's nose, as much of our woodwork is now destroyed.
See also: nose

a camel is a horse designed by a committee

Committees, due to their reliance on several different opinions and viewpoints, produce results that are fragmented, inefficient, or of poor quality, especially compared to the work of a single individual or a small team. A: "Did you see this latest memo? Can you believe the asinine decisions the task force made?" B: "Well, a camel is a horse designed by a committee."

It is the last straw that breaks the camel's back

After someone or something has experienced a series of recurring offenses or problems, even a minor one can be the one that causes one to finally lose patience or for something to stop working. It alludes to the idea that a single additional piece of straw could cause an overladen camel to finally collapse. Common versions of this phrase are "the last straw" and "the straw that broke the camel's back." A: "Why are you furious now? Tom's been taking credit for your ideas for years." B: "It is the last straw that breaks the camel's back!" I've hiked miles and miles in these boots—I can't believe they finally fell apart while I was walking in my own driveway! But I guess it is the last straw that breaks the camel's back.
See also: back, break, last, straw, that

the straw that breaks the camel's back

A seemingly small or inconsequential issue, problem, or burden that proves to be the final catalyst in causing an overworked or overburdened person, system, organization, etc., to fail, give up, or collapse. With governmental resources already strained to the breaking point, any sort of environmental disaster would be the straw that breaks the camel's back. I was already fed up with his laziness and insensitivity, but Jim's refusal to come with me to my own mother's funeral was the straw that breaks the camel's back.
See also: back, break, straw, that

the straw that broke the camel's back

A seemingly small or inconsequential issue, problem, or burden that proved to be the final catalyst in causing an overworked or overburdened person, system, organization, etc., to fail, give up, or collapse. I was already fed up with my husband's lazy, selfish ways, but it was his refusal to get off the couch and come with me to my mother's funeral that was the straw that broke the camel's back! With governmental resources already strained to the breaking point, any sort of environmental disaster would likely be the straw that broke the camel's back.
See also: back, broke, straw, that

strain at gnats and swallow camels

Prov. to criticize other people for minor offenses while ignoring major offenses. (Biblical.) Jill: Look at that. Edward is combing his hair at his desk. How unprofessional. Jane: Don't strain at gnats and swallow camels. There are worse problems than that around here.
See also: and, camel, gnat, strain, swallow

camel

see under last straw.

last straw, the

The final annoyance or setback, which even though minor makes one lose patience. For example, I could put up with his delays and missed deadlines, but when he claimed the work was unimportant-that was the last straw! This term is a shortening of the straw that broke the camel's back, which conveys a vivid image of an overloaded animal being given one slight additional weight. The expression dates from the mid-1800s, and replaced the earlier the last feather that breaks the horse's back.
See also: last

the straw that breaks the camel's back

If you say that something is the straw that breaks the camel's back, you mean it is the latest in a series of bad events, and it makes you unable to deal with a situation any longer. Last week, I broke my wrist skateboarding and that was the straw that broke the camel's back as far as my dad was concerned. He has ordered me to stay away from anything that could get me into an accident. Compare with the last straw. Note: The reference here is to an animal which is already carrying a great deal on its back and which collapses when one more thing is added.
See also: back, break, straw, that

camel toes

n. a woman’s vulva as it appears through blue jeans, especially jeans that have been pulled up too tight. There’s nothing attractive about camel toes.
See also: camel, toe

the straw that broke the camel's back

The final limit of capacity, including patience. An Arabian anecdote told of a camel whose owner loaded the beast of burden with as much straw as possible. Not satisfied with the staggering load he had put on the camel, the owner added just one last piece of straw. Even that one wisp was too much, and the animal collapsed with a broken back, leaving the owner with no way to take his goods to the market. The story is a parable for all the times you've been repeatedly irked until you can't take it anymore and you explode.
See also: back, broke, straw, that
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Majid observed that one litre of camel milk had nearly
Camel milk was now available in the markets on the rates of Rs 110 per litre, he said added that basic aim of marketing was to improve financial condition of the camel farmers.
The objective of that project was to improve the production and productivity of camels by improving diagnostics, surveillance and the provision of free veterinary care services.
Today despite modern urbanisation, camels remain a great source of pride not only for camel breeders but all Arabs, who recognise camels as icons of Arab heritage, life and economy.
Today, there are only non-binding rules, and owners do not have to register their camels with the authorities.
The month-long King Abdulaziz Camels Festival 2018 will celebrate the crucial role of the camel through an eclectic mix of traditional events, competitions and heritage-focused activities, including new and innovative activations detailed below:
Everyday, I have people taking the camels to Maqaba and selling fresh milk on the roadside," he told the GDN.
Third was Technology of manufacturing of camels production pivot and last was pivot health and combating camels diseases.
Al-Junaibi pointed out that "Maqydhat Al Hijin" extends for more than 3 months, in summer, and starts from May to the end of August as "Maqydhat Al Hijin" is practiced in most governorates, which are renowned for breeding racing camels and camels' beauty show.
Ladakh (Jammu and Kashmir) [India], Aug 3 ( ANI ): Camel safari in Ladakh is becoming popular sport in the Nubra Valley.
Caption: POSING--This rather shaggy camel served as a model for the new reflector meant to protect camels from drivers.
As well as parades for the most beautiful camel, the King Abdulaziz Camels Festival also includes entertainment such as poetry, folk songs (shalat), feasts and camel auctions throughout the month long festivities.
But Mariam Maalim's camels still manage to find something to eat.
The research team collected camel hair samples from 30 dromedary camels along with three racing camels in Al Ain and then prepared the hairs for analysis a process that required the hairs to be pulverized, decontaminated, sonicated and extracted prior to analysis.
Also, medical camps will be set up for camels suffering from ' Surra', a dangerous disease which infects its blood and often, proves fatal.