building

(redirected from Buildings)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

build castles in the sky

To create dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—don't just build castles in the sky.
See also: build, castle, sky

build castles in Spain

To create dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—don't just build castles in Spain.
See also: build, castle, Spain

confidence-building measure

Any action taken to eliminate or reduce the fear of attack or escalation of conflict between two or more parties, as in international politics, interpersonal communication, business interactions, etc. The term is usually pluralized. The two countries, long on the brink of all-out war, have introduced several confidence-building measures between their governments to facilitate better communication and hopefully avert the need for a military offensive by either side. One of our goals in marriage counseling is to create confidence-building measures between spouses, so that each person learns to communicate their frustrations before they turn into a source of conflict.
See also: measure

Elvis has left the building

Said when an event or performance has come to an end, or when someone or something has left a place, especially in a dramatic fashion. The phrase refers to an announcement famously made at the end of Elvis Presley concerts alerting people that he vacated the premises and no further encores would be played. We kept waiting for the band to come back on stage to perform some of the fans' favorite songs, but it looked like Elvis had left the building. That ball is flying, and it looks like... yes, it's a homerun! Elvis has left the building, folks!
See also: building, left

build a case against (someone or something)

To compile evidence that supports an argument or charges against someone or something. The job of the prosecutor is to build a case against the defendant. We're trying to build a case against the company because many employees have been wrongly terminated.
See also: build, case

build bridges

To connect disparate people or groups. The senator was working to build bridges between the two parties on the contentious issue. A lingua franca is used to build bridges between people who do not speak the same language.
See also: bridge, build

build castles in the air

To create dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—don't just build castles in the air.
See also: air, build, castle

build down

To decrease or lessen. That group encourages the government to build down on wasteful spending. Give the traffic some time to build down before you leave the office—otherwise, you'll just sit on the highway for an hour.
See also: build, down

build (one's) hopes on (someone or something)

To have expectations that are tied to the success, performance, etc., of a particular person or thing. Why are we building our hopes on him when we know he's not popular enough to defeat the incumbent? I had built my hopes on this promotion and was crushed when I didn't get it.
See also: build, hope, on

build in

To include something as a fundamental component of something else. A noun can be used between "build" and "in" or after "in." Be sure to build in some extra time for questions from the audience. There's hardly any storage in the house right now, so we asked the contractor to build more shelves in.
See also: build

build into (something)

1. To include something as a fundamental component of something else. A noun can be used between "build" and "into." What new features did they build into this app update? Be sure to build time for audience questions into your presentation.
2. To give someone an essential role in something. A noun can be used between "build" and "into." Of course that company isn't hiring—the CEO has built all of his pals into every department!
See also: build

build on(to) (something)

To use something as a foundation and expand upon or add to it. A noun can be used between "build" and "on(to)." This kitchen is far too small—we'll need to build an addition onto it. And to build on Katie's point about romanticism in the text, the description of nature at the beginning of chapter 2 is a fine example of that.
See also: build

build out of (something)

To assemble or construct something from a certain material. The construction crew plans to build the wall out of bricks.
See also: build, of, out

build out onto (something)

To expand or extend a structure or building into a certain area. Our neighbors had to get a permit to build out onto the undeveloped tract behind their house.
See also: build, out

build (something) out over (something)

To extend a structure or building over a particular area or thing. The house is famous for building an outdoor area out over a waterfall.
See also: build, out, over

build to order

To construct or assemble something in accordance with specific parameters (usually from a buyer). A noun can be used between "build" and "to." The client must be rich if he wants us to build the boat to order!
See also: build, order

build up

1. verb To increase something gradually. A noun or pronoun can be used between "build" and "up" or after "up." I've been putting $50 aside every month in an attempt to build up my savings.
2. verb To encourage or flatter someone. A noun or pronoun can be used between "build" and "up" or after "up." Not getting that job left my son really discouraged, so I've been trying to build him up.
3. verb To become stronger or more muscular. A noun or pronoun can be used between "build" and "up" or after "up." I'm trying to build up my leg muscles so that I can run even faster.
4. verb To develop an area with more buildings or businesses. A noun or pronoun can be used between "build" and "up" or after "up." Wow, they've really built up that part of town—I remember when it was just a field!
5. verb To greatly raise expectations for something by praising or hyping it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "build" and "up" or after "up." I thought that movie was really disappointing, possibly because my friends told me how amazing it was and built it up too much.
6. verb To accumulate over time. A noun or pronoun can be used between "build" and "up" or after "up." You should wash your hair every day, unless you want oily residue building up. The dirty laundry is really building up—when was the last time you did the wash?
7. noun An accumulation of something. The phrase is often hyphenated in this usage. I use so many products in my hair that I need to wash the build-up out at the end of the day. It looks like you've got a lot of build-up around the filter. It should run fine after I clean it.
See also: build, up

build up a head of steam

To gain momentum or the energy needed to move forward. The protests against the corrupt organization built up a head of steam when the national media started covering the story. You can't make the jump standing still—you'll need to build up a head of steam.
See also: build, head, of, steam, up

build up to (something)

1. To reach something gradually. I know you're building up to your point, but you're also putting your audience to sleep. You can't just walk into the gym and grab the 50-pound weights—you need to build up to that!
2. To become or develop into something gradually. The issues that you're trying to ignore in your relationship will build up to serious problems in time.
See also: build, up

(as) busy as a beaver (building a new dam)

Very busy, assiduous, or hardworking. The phrase refers to beavers' reputation for being extremely industrious. Between working two part-time jobs, volunteering on the weekends, and looking after his little brother, Sam's been busy as a beaver this summer. I've been as busy as a beaver building a new dam this year. I've had almost no free time!
See also: beaver, busy, new

build castles in the air

 and build castles in Spain
Fig. to daydream; to make plans that can never come true. Ann spends most of her time building castles in Spain. I really like to sit on the porch in the evening, just building castles in the air.
See also: air, build, castle

build down

[for traffic] to reduce in volume or diminish. At about six, the going-home traffic begins to build down. When traffic builds down, I leave for home.
See also: build, down

build someone or something up

 
1. Lit. to make someone or something bigger or stronger. Tom is lifting weights to build himself up for basketball. Tom needs to build up his upper body.
2. Fig. to advertise, praise, or promote someone or something. Theatrical agents work very hard to build up their clients. Advertising can build a product up so much that everyone will want it.
See also: build, up

build someone or something up (into someone or something)

to develop or advance someone or something into a particular [desirable] kind of person or thing. The publicity people built her up into a singer whom everyone looked forward to hearing. The agent built up the local band into a top national act.
See also: build, up

build someone or something up (into someone or something)

to develop or advance someone or something into a particular [desirable] kind of person or thing. The publicity people built her up into a singer whom everyone looked forward to hearing. The agent built up the local band into a top national act.
See also: build, up

build someone up (for something)

Fig. to prepare someone for something; to bring a person into a state of mind to accept some information. We built them up for the challenge they were to face. We had to build up the woman before breaking the bad news.
See also: build, up

build something to order

to build an individual object according to a special set of specifications. I am having them build a new house to order—just for us. The car will be built to order.
See also: build, order

build something up

 
1. Lit. to add buildings to an area of land or a neighborhood. They are really building this area up. There is no more open space. They built up the area over the years.
2. Fig. to develop, accumulate, or increase something, such as wealth, business, goodwill, etc. I built this business up through hard work and hope. She built up a good business over the years.
3. Fig. to praise or exalt something; to exaggerate the virtues of something. The master of ceremonies built the act up so much that everyone was disappointed when they saw it. He built up the act too much.
See also: build, up

build up

to increase; to develop. The storm clouds are building up. Better close the windows.
See also: build, up

build down

Reduce, diminish, as in Owing to increased vigilance, traffic in narcotics is finally building down. This term, the antonym of build up, came into use about 1980 with regard to reducing the stockpile of nuclear weapons and soon was applied more widely.
See also: build, down

build in

Also, build into. Construct or include as an integral part; also, make automatic, concomitant, or inherent. For example, Frank Lloyd Wright liked to build in as much furniture as possible, not just bookcases but desks, tables, and the like , or We've got to build some slack into the schedule for this project. The literal usage referring to physical objects dates from the late 1920s. The figurative arose a decade or so later. Both are frequently used in past participle form, that is, built in.
See also: build

build up

1. Fill an area with houses or other buildings, urbanize. For example, We want to protect the wetlands against those who want to build up the area. [c. 1400]
2. Gradually develop, increase in stages. For example, I want to build up my endurance for the race. [Early 1700s]
3. Accumulate or collect, as in A lot of rust has built up on the farm machinery. [Mid-1900s]
4. Increase, strengthen, develop toward, as in The sound built up until it was nearly deafening, or His argument was building up to a grand climax. [c. 1930]
5. Establish or enhance a reputation; praise or flatter. For example, Months before the official campaign could begin, they had been building up the senator's image . [c. 1930]
See also: build, up

build bridges

COMMON If you build bridges between groups of people, you do something to improve the relationship between them. It was our duty to help build bridges between the communities involved. We are looking for ways to build bridges between our two organizations. Note: You can call this process bridge-building. Do all you can to develop an open mind which allows bridge-building between you. Lovett took the initiative to arrange a bridge-building luncheon at which a compromise could be agreed.
See also: bridge, build

build up a head of steam

1. If someone or something builds up a head of steam, they get enough energy or support to make something happen. Agitation for reform had built up a head of steam sufficient to make it inevitable. Note: Verbs such as work up, produce or gather can be used instead of build up. The campaign is gathering a head of steam. Note: You can also use a head of steam to talk about a situation where there is a lot of support for something. While most MPs still believe an election next year is more likely, there's an increasing head of steam behind November. They need to get a sufficient head of steam to force the Foreign Office to act on their behalf.
2. If someone builds up a head of steam, they gradually become more and more angry, anxious, or emotional about something until they can no longer hide their feelings. She had built up a head of steam while waiting to speak to him. Note: Verbs such as work up or get up can be used instead of build up. Now well into his mid-30s, Elton still manages to work up a head of steam over little things. Note: A steam engine can only work when the steam has reached a particular pressure level.
See also: build, head, of, steam, up

build castles in the air (or in Spain)

have a visionary and unattainable scheme; daydream.
The concept was known to St Augustine ( 354–430 ), who uses the phrase subtracto fundamento in aere aedificare meaning ‘build on air without foundation’. Castles in the air has been the version predominant in English since the late 16th century, but castles in Spain , from Old French châteaux en Espagne , was used in the late medieval period and occasionally in more recent times. The form of the saying in Old French, known from the 13th century, may refer to the fact that much of Spain in the Middle Ages was under Moorish control, so any scheme to build castles there was clearly unlikely to succeed.
See also: air, build, castle

build ˈbridges (between A and B/with somebody)

if you build bridges between people who disagree on something or who do not like each other, you try to find ways to improve the relationship between them: The police are trying to build bridges with the local community. ▶ ˈbridge-building noun: The company has a lot of bridge-building to do with angry investors.
See also: bridge, build

build in

v.
To construct or include something as an integral part of another thing: When you install the new bathroom, make sure to build in a towel rack. We didn't add shelves to the wall; we built them in when we constructed the house.
See also: build

build up

v.
1. To develop or increase something in stages or by degrees: I'm building up my endurance for the big race by running every day. We built the family business up over many years.
2. To accumulate, collect or increase: Sediment is building up on the riverbank.
3. To become bigger, stronger, or bulkier, especially through exercise: I need to build up if I'm going to make the football team this year.
4. To bolster something: The company plans to build up their new product with a big advertising campaign. The interview went well and built up my hopes for getting the job.
5. To fill some region with buildings: There was a forest here before they started building up the area. The developer bought the farmland and built it up.
See also: build, up
References in classic literature ?
Garthwaite held me by the arm, and we pressed close against the front of a building.
Half a block down another building opened fire on us.
He had seen airships flying low and swift over darkened and groaning streets; watched great buildings, suddenly red-lit amidst the shadows, crumple at the smashing impact of bombs; witnessed for the first time in his life the grotesque, swift onset, of insatiable conflagrations.
Below, the immense buildings, tremendous and fine as they were, seemed like the giant trees of a jungle fighting for life; their picturesque magnificence was as planless as the chances of crag and gorge, their casualty enhanced by the smoke and confusion of still unsubdued and spreading conflagrations.
As soon as the plans were drawn for the new building, the students began digging out the earth where the foundations were to be laid, working after the regular classes were over.
The balance of them, with the exception of a single sentinel beside the gate, had re-entered the building from which they had been summoned.
Waiting there he heard the party approach the building, he heard someone at the entrance to his hiding place, and then he heard the door past which he had come slam to.
The task of erecting the building had been unanimously transferred to Mr.
As the building was made of bricks, he was enabled to conceal his design until the moment arrived for placing the frames; then, indeed, it became necessary to act.
That they had gone down and not up I was sure from my knowledge of these ancient buildings and the methods of the Warhoons.
To reach this building, which I now felt it imperative that I do, I must needs traverse the entire length of one square and cross a broad avenue and a portion of the plaza.
In common with the squatting apes and the demon with the club he turned in the direction of the sound, to see a company of sturdy bowmen rushing from the doorway of a near-by building.
As he advanced along the street through which the two had been conducted earlier in the day he noted, as had they, the change in the type of buildings as he passed from a residence district into that portion occupied by shops and bazaars.
The steward promised to do all in his power to carry out the count's wishes, seeing clearly that not only would the count never be able to find out whether all measures had been taken for the sale of the land and forests and to release them from the Land Bank, but would probably never even inquire and would never know that the newly erected buildings were standing empty and that the serfs continued to give in money and work all that other people's serfs gave- that is to say, all that could be got out of them.
Beside the finished building another had been begun, surrounded by scaffolding.
Full browser ?