boomer

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baby boomer

An American person born during the "baby boom" following World War II, between the years of 1945 and 1965, during which the population of the United States increased by 40 percent. Typically used to describe members of this generation, who have been associated with economic prosperity, consumerism, self-indulgence. Primarily heard in US. Since baby boomers represent such a large percentage of the population, financial experts are concerned about the impact their retirement will have on the economy.
See also: baby, boomer

a ˈbaby boomer

(American English also a ˈboomer) a person born during a period when many more babies are born than usual (called a baby boom), especially after the Second World War: The new President was a baby boomer, born in the 1950s.
See also: baby, boomer

(baby) boomer

n. someone born during the baby boom—from the last years of World War II until the early 1960s. When the baby boomers get around to saving up for retirement, you’re going to see a lot of investment scams.
See also: baby, boomer

boomer

verb

boomer

1. n. a laborer who moves from one economic boom to another. Fred’s great uncle was a boomer in the days of the Oklahoma oil rush.
2. Go to (baby) boomer.

thunder-boomer

n. a thunderstorm. There will be thunder-boomers in the boonies tonight.

baby boomer

One of approximately 77 million persons born during the two decades following the end of World War II (1945). In 1951, a New York Post columnist Sylvia Porter is thought to have been the first to call the large postwar increase in births a “boom.” The return of veterans and the expansion of the economy with higher incomes are some of the factors accounting for the increase. Healthier and wealthier than previous generations, the baby boomers to some extent rejected traditional values and embraced social and cultural change. Their identity as a group was indicated by Time magazine’s choice of the Baby Boom Generation as its 1966 “Man of the Year.” Aging baby boomers, so characterized after they reached the age of 40, are still named by the cliché. A June 13, 2010, article by Patricia Cohen in the New York Times said, “Baby boomers have long been considered the generation that did not want to grow up, perpetual adolescents even as they become eligible for Social Security.”
See also: baby, boomer
References in periodicals archive ?
* Brick-and-mortar is far from dead; 82 percent of Gen Xers and 82 percent of boomers surveyed buy in-store at least monthly.
Rose homered in the top of the fourth to break a scoreless game and give the Boomers a 1-0 lead in the second contest.
Baby boomers have more trust in financial institutions than younger generations but less trust in social media sites.
Seventy-two percent of boomers in the poll said they felt financially prepared for retirement, up from 58% who said this in 2010.
* 1 in 4 baby boomers have less than $5,000 saved for retirement
Only 27 percent of boomers think they have enough money to pay for health care expenses and only 16 percent believe they have enough money saved to pay for long-term care--expenses that are a reality for an aging population.
Many companies mistakenly assume that Baby Boomers have already fixated on the brands from which they will buy and that their earning and spending potential is on the decline, and so they've lost interest in marketing to them.
"We've been designing and offering products for boomers for decades, but we don't specifically target boomers with programs," Spilman said.
The study -- New Expectations, New Rewards: Work in Retirement for Middle-Income Boomers -- surveyed 1,005 middle-income Boomers (261 from Midwest) and 2,293 retired Boomers (581 from Midwest) aged 51 to 69 with an annual household income between USD25,000 and USD100,000.
Boomers' tastes and eating habits are evolving to match their changing health and wellness needs.
Synopsis: Older baby boomers aged 60 to 68 are more engaged in their work than are younger boomers aged 50 to 59, suggesting that engaged workers are most likely to continue working after age 60, possibly because they find their jobs fulfilling.
Only 4 in 10 (41 percent) of middle-income baby boomers use the services of a financial professional, according to a new report.
As Baby Boomers begin to retire, they may start to make fewer trips to open houses and more trips to home improvement stores.
New Orleans, LA, May 30, 2014 --(PR.com)-- Media Network catering to Late Generation Xers and Baby Boomers, Boomers Lifestyle Network (KBLN), launches June 1st at www.KBLN.net.