boneyard

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boneyard

1. A cemetery or graveyard. I refuse to walk through a boneyard at night—all the graves just creep me out.
2. A place where old, unused things accumulate. A: "It looks like our neighbors' lawn has become a boneyard." B: "Yep, everything there has five layers of rust!"

boneyard

1. n. a cemetery. I’d like to be planted in a boneyard like that.
2. n. a junkyard. (From sense 1) This old car’s ready for the boneyard.
References in periodicals archive ?
At a moment of crisis, he visits an aircraft boneyard. Climbing aboard the partly demolished B-17 Round Trip?
Songs like "Romance is Dead" from the 2005 album "Killing With a Smile" showcase the band at its heaviest, whereas songs like "Boneyards" and "Idols and Anchors" from 2007's "Horizons" are more melodic.
Beyond the reverse engineers on its full-time staff, the company has an extensive network of technical experts and access to technology "boneyards" to determine if patented technology was actually derived from the public domain.
In essence, she became a sort of boneyards artist-in-residence.
He goes to what he calls "boneyards," which are junkyards for old iron, in search of steam engines to restore.
Indianapolis, IN, in 1981, had observed, while making the rounds selling filtration products, that more efficient centrifuge separators were often found in company boneyards or resting, unused, in a plant corner.
Above all, African images are palisades, they guard, they filter, they watch--as does Dial's masterpiece sculpture of a cat surmounted by fowls and surmounting skeletal persons, perhaps warning, like Kongo boneyards: Mess with us and go to death.
Aircraft once vital to victory stood row upon row in boneyards, awaiting scrap dealers' cutting torches.
Following the war, Arizona Highways editor Raymond Carlson wrote of the WWII planes in his state's boneyards: "In their fighting days they were proud, serene, deadly rulers of all the skies above Earth, magnificent machines of war, beloved by the young men who were part of them." At the Military Aviation Museum, these magnificent machines of war still rule the skies, if only for brief moments.
"Boneyards: Detroit Under Ground" looks at the history of the Detroit metropolitan area and how it has dealt with and honored its dead throughout the centuries of its existence.
By the mid-1800s, graveyards were called cemeteries and considered "nice, sweet, pleasant, soft" places versus the more dour boneyards of the past, she said.
Urban Exploration is the art of sneaking into abandoned or off-limits factors, aviation ' boneyards', and other derelict ex-military or industrial centers to photograph abandoned holdings, and NIGHT VISION captures these Urban Exploration results, comes from one of the foremost photographers of the phenomenon, and offers a blend of night photos and special lighting effects.
Two warbird graveyards, now called boneyards, still exist in the Arizona desert near Tucson.
Boneyard Studios, founded in 2012 in a dense, walkable, urban neighborhood in the Washington DC area, is a micro-village of four tiny houses on wheels, with the largest measuring just over two hundred square feet.
In a back alley in Washington, a four-unit tiny-house community has taken root at Boneyard Studios (www.boneyardstudios.com), showcasing the possibilities of small-is-beautiful housing in the heart of the nation's capital.