blood, sweat, and tears


Also found in: Acronyms.

blood, sweat, and tears

A huge or maximum amount of effort, dedication, and hard work. I poured my blood, sweat, and tears into this company, and I refuse to let you destroy it! Let's take a moment to acknowledge the people whose blood, sweat, and tears went into this project.
See also: and, tear
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

blood, sweat, and tears

Fig. the signs of great personal effort. There will be much blood, sweat, and tears before we have completed this project. After years of blood, sweat, and tears, Timmy finally earned a college degree.
See also: and, tear
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

blood, sweat, and tears

COMMON If a task involves blood, sweat, and tears, it is very hard to do and involves a lot of effort or suffering. It's almost as if the end product — the songs themselves — are less important than the blood, sweat and tears that went into them. He started work at the company which his wife, Pat, had spilled blood, sweat and tears to form. Note: This expression is originally from a wartime speech by the British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in which he said, `I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat'. He used the expression several times in other wartime speeches.
See also: and, tear
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

blood, sweat, and tears

extremely hard work; unstinting effort.
In May 1940 Winston Churchill made a speech in the House of Commons in which he declared: ‘I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears, and sweat.’
See also: and, tear
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌblood, sweat and ˈtears

very hard work; a lot of effort: The only way to succeed is through old-fashioned blood, sweat and tears.
See also: and, sweat, tear
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

blood, sweat, and tears

Hard work; enormous effort. The phrase is associated with one of the twentieth century’s finest speakers, Winston Churchill, who on becoming Britain’s prime minister in 1940 said, “I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, sweat and tears” (today the “toil” is often dropped when quoting him). The phrase was not original with Churchill. In 1611 John Donne wrote (First Anniversary), “. . . ’tis in vaine to dew, or mollifie it [this world] with thy teares, or sweat, or blood.” Among others who used similar phrases were Byron, Browning, and Gladstone.
See also: and, tear
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Jimmy Carter, following in the footsteps of popular 20th-century statesman Winston Churchill, has offered America one-third of the famous 'blood, sweat, and tears' combination.
"I went through a lot of blood, sweat, and tears for this one and it wouldn't be right to just stop here in Great Falls," he said.
"He had previously employed similar phrases, such as "Their sweat, their tears, their blood" and "new structures of national life erected upon blood, sweat, and tears." These have since been appreciated as a paraphrase of Guiseppi Garibaldi's rallying cry to revolutionary forces in Rome nearly a century earlier, in 1849: "I offer hunger, thirst, forced marches, battle, and death.
Blood, sweat, and tears; the changing concepts of physiology from antiquity into early modern Europe.
We have nothing to offer but blood, sweat, and tears, but then, as now, Britain will succeed.