blind spot

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blind spot

1. An area that is not able to be seen, either due to its location outside of the field of vision, or due to some physical obstruction or a defect in one's vision. Often used to describe the areas around a car that cannot be seen with the rear-view or side mirrors. This car has a big blind spot on the right side, so remember to always turn your head to look before merging. Leslie always experiences blind spots when she starts to get a migraine. That security camera has a blind spot—and that's where we'll sneak in.
2. By extension, an aspect of one's life or a certain situation that one is ignorant of or that one does not understand fully. Jen has a real blind spot when it comes to her relationships with men trying to take advantage of her wealth.
See also: blind, spot

blind spot

Subject about which one is ignorant or biased. For example, The boss has a blind spot about Henry; he wouldn't fire him for anything, or Dad has a blind spot about opera; he can't see anything good about it. This term uses blind in the sense of "covered or hidden from sight." It has two literal meanings: an insensitive part of the retina and an area outside one's field of vision. The phrase has largely replaced blind side, which survives mainly in the verb to blindside, meaning "to hit someone on an unguarded side" and "to deal an unexpected blow." [Mid-1800s]
See also: blind, spot

a blind spot

COMMON A blind spot is an area of knowledge or understanding that you do not have or pay no attention to. The government have a blind spot when it comes to the environment. Patrick's never been great with money — it's a bit of a blind spot with him.
See also: blind, spot

a blind spot

1 an area into which you cannot see. 2 an aspect of something that someone knows or cares little about.
These general senses appear to have developed from a mid 19th-century cricketing term for the spot of ground in front of a batsman where a ball pitched by the bowler leaves the batsman undecided whether to play forward to it or back.
See also: blind, spot

a/somebody’s ˈblind spot

a small part of a subject that somebody does not understand or know anything about: I’m a real music lover but I have to say that modern jazz is a bit of a blind spot with me.
See also: blind, spot
References in periodicals archive ?
His first analysis is from Cervantes's Don Quixote, from which several central ideas emerge: (1) Don Quixote, as the first modern novel, already "contains the germ of all future possibilities of the genre"; (2) Don Quixote in itself is a novel of the blind spot; (3) The blind-spot novels are those that collect the legacy of Cervantes and that express an ironic vision of the world; and (4) "the ideal instrument to place the irony in the very center of the novel" is, for Cercas, "the blind spot.
Cyclist Georgia Brown commented: I did know about the blind spot but getting in there and seeing it was very informative I didnt realise it was so bad.
People with this blind spot lose connection to their social support networks in the midst of challenges when they should be investing more heavily in their support systems.
Perhaps as a result of those blind spots, the vast majority of respondents indicated that their company's focus on FX exposure management is growing, and they expect that trend to continue over the next year or two (see Figure 2, below).
Hope Fennell, left, was killed by a lorry in Kings Heath in 2011 - too many HGVs have blind spots, says an MEP
Mature Drivers has recognised Blind Spot Warning systems with the highest ranking in its list of 10 new vehicle features.
Eilidh's mother, Heather, who still lives at Ellingham, and her sister Kate, who lives in Newton by the Sea, began campaigning with North East MEP Fiona Hall for all HGVs in Europe to be fitted with cameras and sensors to remove their blind spots.
Dilks' team later identified where the blind spot was for each volunteer's other eye, and then presented an image of a square right next to it.
Unfortunately, blind spots can be so embedded in our personality that we struggle to recognize and address them.
However, in such methods of surveillance, image processing is conducted separately for each camera, thereby resulting in such problems as the presence of a single individual that is accounted for multiple times by several cameras, or lead to blind spots caused when an individual is hidden behind another individual from certain cameras, making it difficult to accurately assess the number of individuals shown in images and extract each individual's motion path from the images.
And he's got a huge blind spot - his love for this woman.
SOME popular family 4x4 off-road vehicles often used on the school run have "dangerous" blind spots, it was revealed today.
Tokyo, Japan, Sept 21, 2006 - (JCN) - Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), in collaboration with the National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities, has developed an electronic wheelchair with a 360-degree camera that leaves no blind spots.
It is to the credit of science that scientism itself is being shown its own shortcomings and blind spots.
The starfield covers 180 degrees on the dome without any cutouts or blind spots along the horizon.