blind spot

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blind spot

1. An area that is not able to be seen, either due to its location outside of the field of vision, or due to some physical obstruction or a defect in one's vision. Often used to describe the areas around a car that cannot be seen with the rear-view or side mirrors. This car has a big blind spot on the right side, so remember to always turn your head to look before merging. Leslie always experiences blind spots when she starts to get a migraine. That security camera has a blind spot—and that's where we'll sneak in.
2. By extension, an aspect of one's life or a certain situation that one is ignorant of or that one does not understand fully. Jen has a real blind spot when it comes to her relationships with men trying to take advantage of her wealth.
See also: blind, spot
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

blind spot

Subject about which one is ignorant or biased. For example, The boss has a blind spot about Henry; he wouldn't fire him for anything, or Dad has a blind spot about opera; he can't see anything good about it. This term uses blind in the sense of "covered or hidden from sight." It has two literal meanings: an insensitive part of the retina and an area outside one's field of vision. The phrase has largely replaced blind side, which survives mainly in the verb to blindside, meaning "to hit someone on an unguarded side" and "to deal an unexpected blow." [Mid-1800s]
See also: blind, spot
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a blind spot

COMMON A blind spot is an area of knowledge or understanding that you do not have or pay no attention to. The government have a blind spot when it comes to the environment. Patrick's never been great with money — it's a bit of a blind spot with him.
See also: blind, spot
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

a blind spot

1 an area into which you cannot see. 2 an aspect of something that someone knows or cares little about.
These general senses appear to have developed from a mid 19th-century cricketing term for the spot of ground in front of a batsman where a ball pitched by the bowler leaves the batsman undecided whether to play forward to it or back.
See also: blind, spot
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a/somebody’s ˈblind spot

a small part of a subject that somebody does not understand or know anything about: I’m a real music lover but I have to say that modern jazz is a bit of a blind spot with me.
See also: blind, spot
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
BLIS uses two radar sensors located behind each rear wheel to monitor the driver's blind spots. If it detects a vehicle in either blind spot, it alerts the driver by illuminating an indicator in the wing mirror.
The constant identification and monitoring of vital domains alerting companies to security blind spots allows them to take quick action to reduce real-world online threats to their web presence, customer data, and business-critical functions.
Ford Motor Company (NYSE: F), a United States-based automaker, is adding a Blind Spot Information System to its 2019 Ranger.
"Customisable screen views and system triggers integrated to the vehicle provide a whole new driving experience, ensuring full 360* visibility around the vehicle at all times, eliminating blind spots and improving fleet safety," he added.
His first analysis is from Cervantes's Don Quixote, from which several central ideas emerge: (1) Don Quixote, as the first modern novel, already "contains the germ of all future possibilities of the genre"; (2) Don Quixote in itself is a novel of the blind spot; (3) The blind-spot novels are those that collect the legacy of Cervantes and that express an ironic vision of the world; and (4) "the ideal instrument to place the irony in the very center of the novel" is, for Cercas, "the blind spot." Thus, the argument can be summarized in this way: the great modern novel is the heir of and debtor to Don Quixote to the extent that, already in the seventeenth century, Don Quixote contains all the modern elements which the novel will only fully develop from the nineteenth century on.
So, when we speak of a blind spot, perhaps this is the blind spot we have in ourselves.
The "blind spot" is the area in the back of the eyeball that lacks receptors id thus cannot absorb the light coming into the eye.
Brigade recommends a three-pronged approach to safety: driver visibility aids such as cameras to eliminate blind spots; driver alerts triggered by external sensors that identify potential collisions; and warnings for vulnerable people outside the vehicle such as reversing alarms.
"The fact that 64 percent of the polled corporates are either unsure or said 'yes' to having blind spots is not overly surprising, but it is dangerous," Gage says.
"Driver blind spots have been implicated in the tragic death of Hope Fennell and a growing toll of fatal accidents involving pedestrians, cyclists and even cars dragged underneath heavy goods vehicles.
We will not rest until the deaths diminish." Mrs Hall said: "It is simply not good enough that the Commission has taken over a year to come out with this study that basically says there are not enough facts and figures available to assess the cost-effectiveness of new devices designed to eradicate blind spots.
Whilst there is so much concern about the blind spots of buses and heavy goods vehicles, has anyone thought to educate the cyclists that deliberately go into these blind spots (News, PE May)?
The Kirklees Bike Users Group (KBUG) and building materials company Myers Group are raising awareness about the blind spots lorry drivers have where cyclists are concerned.
However, with those strengths come some blind spots. I can see things in the future as developing trends in a focused and positive way.