blessed

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bless (one) with (something)

1. To bestow something favorable upon someone, as of a gift from God. The Lord has blessed us with fine weather during the harvest season.
2. To anoint someone with something during a religious ritual. The priest blessed the baby with holy oil during the baptism ceremony.
See also: bless

blessed

A common hashtag on social media posts that may accompany a sincere expression of gratitude or may be used comically or as an attempt to mask bragging. It is sometimes spoken, usually humorously. How awesome is my new apartment?! #blessed My mom came over with chicken soup tonight because I wasn't feeling well. She's the best, hashtag blessed. Well, this adorable infant just puked on me. #blessed

blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed

Having high expectations often leads to disappointment when the desired result does not occur, so keeping expectations low will save one from being disappointed. I promised myself I wouldn't get my hopes up, so when I found out that my first-choice school had rejected me, I was actually OK with it. Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

blessed with (something)

Possessing something beneficial, such as a positive ability, quality, or general state of welfare. The phrase implies that such a thing was bestowed by a deity or through good fortune. My brother has been blessed with athletic abilities that the rest of us kids seriously lack. We should never forget that we have been blessed with wealth, and with that comes the responsibility to do good with it.
See also: blessed

it is better to give than to receive

It is more virtuous to give or yield something than to receive something. The idea is Biblical in origin. It is better to give than to receive, so we're going to donate these dolls to people who are less fortunate. Right, honey?
See also: better, give, receive

it is more blessed to give than to receive

It is more virtuous to give or yield something than to receive something. The phrase comes from the Bible's Acts of the Apostles. It is more blessed to give than to receive, so we're going to donate these dolls to people who are less fortunate. Right, honey?
See also: blessed, give, more, receive

the blessed event

The birth of a baby. She's almost nine months pregnant, so the blessed event will be happening very soon!
See also: blessed, event

blessed event

Fig. the birth of a child. My sister is expecting a blessed event sometime in May. The young couple anxiously awaited the blessed event.
See also: blessed, event

Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

Prov. If you do not expect good things to happen, you will not be disappointed when they fail to happen. Ellen: This is going to be the best vacation we've ever had; we're going to have fun every minute of every day. Fred: Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed. Jill: Do you think you'll win the contest? Jane: I like to keep in mind that blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

It is better to give than to receive.

 and It is more blessed to give than to receive.
Prov. It is more virtuous to give things than to get them. (Biblical.) Susan told her children, "Instead of thinking so much about what you want for your birthday, think about what to give your brothers and sisters for their birthdays. Remember, it is better to give than to receive." Our charity encourages you to share the good things you have. It is more blessed to give than to receive.
See also: better, give, receive

blessed event

The birth of a baby, as in When is the blessed event expected? This expression combines two senses of blessed, that is, "happy" and "sacred." Today, however, unless used ironically, it is considered cloyingly sentimental. [1920s]
See also: blessed, event

blessed event

The birth of a baby. This cloyingly sentimental cliché, dating from about 1920, may well be dying out. It uses blessed in the sense of “happy,” not in the ironic sense of “cursed” or “damned” (as in “Every blessed piece of today’s mail is a bill”).
See also: blessed, event
References in periodicals archive ?
During the ceremony, Blessed Paul had said, 'Nunzio Sulprizio will tell you that the period of youth should not be considered the age of free passions, of inevitable falls, of invincible crises, of decadent pessimism, of harmful selfishness.
Blessed Sister Marianne Cope (1838-1918), was a mother to Molokai lepers.
Italian laywoman Maria Corsini was beatified in 2001, just 35 years after her death, along with her husband Luigi Beltrame Quattrocchi, the first married couple to be declared "blessed." Nicaraguan Salesian Sr.
The same ceremony will see Blessed Andre Bessette (Brother Andre) raised to the altars of the Church.
IT MAY TAKE decades for the Philippines to produce another saint, but some Filipino Catholic bishops are hopeful that the canonization of Blessed Pedro Calungsod would spark an awareness of the call to holiness and "the age of saints" in the country.
The Man Who Founded California: The Life of Blessed Junipero Serra.
Brian Blessed was halfway up Mount Everest without oxygen - and staring death in the face.
On Monday evening July 14, 2008, Father Thomas Rosica, presided at a Prayer Vigil and Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament in St.
In the nearly 27 years of his pontificate, Pope John Paul II gave the Church 1338 Blesseds and 482 Saints.
Joining John XXIII and Pius IX as new "blesseds" were three lesser-known figures whose lives overlapped the 19th and 20th centuries: Italian bishop Tomasso Reggio, who founded the Sisters of Holy Mary; Guillaume-Joseph Chaminade, founder of the Marianist community; and Columba Marmion, a Benedictine abbot.
The world today and especially young people have the increasing need of the fascinating lives of the saints and blesseds. During his Pontificate, Pope John Paul II certainly helped us to rediscover these heroes and heroines in our tradition--in fact, he beatified 1338 women and men, and canonized 482 saints.
This is a magnificent reflection on the lives of many of the new saints and blesseds of the Catholic Tradition and their relevance for young adults today.
(Indeed, by limiting the public veneration of Blesseds in geographical scope, the Church seems to encourage this sort of national identification.)
The June 1999 ceremony more than doubled the existing total of 95 Polish blesseds already on record.
Its second edition, reviewed here, has added to the first edition some saints and blesseds who have been beatified or canonized since that time.