Bible

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Related to Bibles: King James Bible

Bible-basher

1. A derogatory term for a Christian considered to be overly focused on the Bible and/or aggressively evangelistic. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. After Mary started spending more time with her church's youth group, her friends from school began to complain that she had become a bit of a Bible-basher.
2. A person who does not approve of the Bible or Christianity. Tired of Bill harassing her about her Christian faith, Joan finally said to him, "You don't have to be a Christian, but I refuse to stay friends with such an intolerant Bible-basher as yourself."

Bible-thumper

A derogatory term for a Christian considered to be overly focused on the Bible and/or aggressively evangelistic. Primarily heard in US. After Mary started spending more time with her church's youth group, her friends from school began to complain that she had become a bit of a Bible-thumper

swear on a stack of Bibles

To make a very serious, solemn pledge, especially that one is telling the truth. A hyperbolic reference to the traditional act of placing one's hand on a Bible while taking an oath, such as before a court proceeding. Janet has sworn on a stack of Bibles that she wasn't the one to betray me, and I believe her. I swear on a stack of Bibles that if I have a chance to help your campaign, I will.
See also: Bible, of, on, stack, swear

the Bible Belt

A region in the United States noted for widespread belief in Christian fundamentalism, typically the Midwest and South. You can expect most politicians to attempt to court voters in the Bible Belt, but, as usual, they are careful about what they say there.
See also: belt, Bible

swear on a stack of Bibles

 and swear on one's mother's grave
to state something very earnestly, pledging to tell the truth. (~ a Stack of Bibles refers in an exaggerated way to swearing to tell the truth in court by placing one's hand on a Bible.) I swear on a stack of Bibles that I am telling the truth. Of course, I'm telling the truth. I swear on my mother's grave!
See also: Bible, of, on, stack, swear

Bible belt

An area noted for religious fundamentalism; specifically, parts of the American South and Midwest. For example, You wouldn't dare try to sell a sex manual in the Bible belt. This term alludes to the prevalence of evangelical revivals, strict morals, belief in the literal truth of the Bible, and similar traits. [c. 1920]
See also: belt, Bible

swear on a stack of Bibles

Promise solemnly that what one is about to say is true, as in I swear on a stack of Bibles that I had nothing to do with his dropping out. This term alludes to the practice of placing one's hand on a sacred object while taking an oath, which dates from the mid-10th century. It is still followed in courts of law where a witness being sworn to tell the truth places a hand on the Bible. [Mid-1800s]
See also: Bible, of, on, stack, swear

swear on a stack of Bibles

If someone swears on a stack of Bibles that something is true, they emphasize their promise that it is true. Our leaders swore on a stack of Bibles there was plenty of oil, and, of course, we wanted to believe them.
See also: Bible, of, on, stack, swear

swear on a stack of Bibles

in. to make a very solemn pledge of one’s honesty. (Folksy. Official oaths are sometimes taken with one hand on a Bible. This phrase implies that more Bibles make an even stronger oath.) I swear on a stack of Bibles that I was in Atlanta on the night of January sixteenth.
See also: Bible, of, on, stack, swear

swear on a stack of Bibles, to

To make a solemn oath. Traditionally a solemn declaration or affirmation was pronounced as being by some sacred being or object. This practice is perpetuated in modern courtrooms by swearing in witnesses, a procedure that involves laying their hands on a Bible and pronouncing “Do you swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth?” Swearing on an entire stack of Bibles thus is construed as carrying considerably more weight than swearing on just one book. An American colloquialism from the mid-nineteenth century, it was used by Billie Holiday in her 1956 memoir, Lady Sings the Blues: “Mom . . . swore on a stack of Bibles I was eighteen.”
See also: of, on, stack, swear
References in classic literature ?
"We have not," says she, "had a morsel to eat, nor have these poor children had a rag to put on, but what his goodness hath bestowed on us." For, indeed, besides the horse and the Bible, Tom had sacrificed a night-gown, and other things, to the use of this distressed family.
Sure no man was ever more thankful in the world for anything of its kind than he was for the Bible, nor, I believe, never any man was glad of a Bible from a better principle; and though he had been a most profligate creature, headstrong, furious, and desperately wicked, yet this man is a standing rule to us all for the well instructing children, viz.
Among the rest, it occurred to him, he said, how his father used to insist so much on the inexpressible value of the Bible, and the privilege and blessing of it to nations, families, and persons; but he never entertained the least notion of the worth of it till now, when, being to talk to heathens, savages, and barbarians, he wanted the help of the written oracle for his assistance.
But it is a grievous thing to me that he should have toiled so hard to translate the Bible, and now the language and the people are gone!
And if you should feel your own self-interest pressing upon your heart too closely, then think of Eliot's Indian Bible. It is good for the world that such a man has lived and left this emblem of his life."
But his zeal did not grow cold; and only about five years before his death he took great pains in preparing a new edition of the Indian Bible."
Eliot did when he translated the Bible for the Indians."
"It seems to me, mamma, the Bible is for every one to read themselves.
"She does love the Bible so much, and wishes so she could read!
"Well, of course, by and by, Eva, you will have other things to think of besides reading the Bible round to servants.
Thick-headed commentators upon the Bible, and stupid preachers and teachers, work more damage to religion than sensible, cool-brained clergymen can fight away again, toil as they may.
"And, Tom, sit down here; I've got something for you to write i' the Bible."
I know a man must have the love o' God in his soul, and the Bible's God's word.
The prisoner then, giving the Bible to Rosa, said, --
Leaving the cell, the young man could still see in the convulsively clinched fingers of Rosa the yellowish leaf from that Bible on which Cornelius de Witt had with such difficulty and pain written these few lines, which, if Van Baerle had read them, would undoubtedly have been the saving of a man and a tulip.