benjamin

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Benjamin's mess

A particularly large portion (of something), or the largest portion given. A reference to Genesis 43:34, in which Joseph, the son of Jacob who was sold to the Egyptians and became a high-ranking official, treated his former brothers to a feast, with his youngest brother Benjamin receiving a portion (often translated as "mess") five times that of the others. The phrase is used almost exclusively in reference to God or religion. When it comes to the love God gives us, we all have Benjamin's mess: many times more than we might have expected or felt we deserve.
See also: mess

Benjamin's portion

A particularly large portion (of something), or the largest portion given. A reference to Genesis 43:34, in which Joseph, the son of Jacob who was sold to the Egyptians and became a high-ranking official, treated his former brothers to a feast, with his youngest brother Benjamin receiving a portion five times that of the others. The phrase is used almost exclusively in reference to God or religion. When it comes to the love God gives us, we all have Benjamin's portion: many times more than we might have expected or felt we deserve.
See also: portion

benjamin

A $100 dollar bill (which features a picture of Benjamin Franklin). I can't believe he dropped a few benjamins on food and drinks for everybody like it wasn't a big deal.

a Benjamin's portion (or mess)

the largest share or portion.
In the Bible, Benjamin was the youngest son of the Jewish patriarch Jacob . When Jacob's sons encountered their long-lost brother Joseph in Egypt, where he had become a high official, they failed to recognize him, but Joseph generously entertained them: ‘And he took and sent messes [servings of food] unto them from before him: but Benjamin's mess was five times so much as any of their's’ (Genesis 43:34).
See also: portion

Benjamin

and Benji
n. a one hundred dollar bill. (Bearing a picture of Benjanin Franklin.) You owe me two Benjamins! Here’s the Benji I owe you.
References in classic literature ?
“For that matter, Mistress Remarkable,” said Benjamin, “there’s none here who will contradict you; for I’m of opinion that it would be as easy to stop a hurricane with a Barcelony handkerchy as to bring up your tongue when the stopper is off.
“Stop your grog, indeed!” said Remarkable, rising with great indignation, and seizing a candle; “you’re groggy now, Benjamin and I’ll quit the room before I hear any misbecoming words from you.” The housekeeper retired, with a manner but little less dignified, as she thought, than the air of the heiress, muttering as she drew the door after her, with a noise like the report of a musket, the opprobrious terms of “drunkard,” “sot,” and “ beast.”
“Who’s that you say is drunk?” cried Benjamin fiercely, rising and making a movement toward Remarkable.
Benjamin here fell back in his chair, and soon gave vent to certain ominous sounds, which resembled not a little the growling of his favorite animal the bear itself.
Benjamin so far rallied his confused faculties as to shape the course of the two former to their respective apartments, when he disappeared himself, leaving the task of securing the house to him who was most interested in its safety.
This volume offers an English version of the catalogue accompanying the 2006 Berlin exhibition of parts of the Benjamin Archives (Walter Benjamins Archive (Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, 2006)).
(2.) Walter Benjamins Archive: Bilder, Texte und Zeichen (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 2006), 30.
--Taken from "It's All About the Benjamins," by Sean "P Diddy" Combs
Benjamins Passages: Dreaming, Awakening gives a careful interpretation of the most relevant stakes in Benjamin's discussion of, amongst other concepts, truth and imagination.
Transtextualitat und Figuraldeutung in Walter Benjamins Geschichtsdenken," but his treatment of it is only part of a larger argument.
"La reception de lessai sur la traduction dans le domaine frangais." Walter Benjamin: traductions critiques/ Walter Benjamins Essay on Translation: Critical Translations.
With the recent explosion of interest in Walter Benjamin and religion over the past ten years or so, it was perhaps inevitable that a book would be published that brought the much bandied-about term "postsecular" into close contact with the name Walter Benjamin.
This article considers Walter Benjamin's 1931 essay on Karl Kraus and explores how Benjamin uses kraus (who was Theodor Lessing's classical example of a self-hating Jew) to explain how Jewish theology can be transformed into secular Jewish cultural identity through quotation.
PEOPLE supporting John Taylor Hospice's campaign to buy a new 'bottom' for Birmingham have the chance to pick up signed goodies from leading poet and author Benjamin Zephaniah.
Benjamin, the Confederate secretary of state and America's first openly Jewish senator.