bench

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bench jockey

slang In baseball, a coach or player who berates or derides the umpire or opposing players from his team's dugout bench. In this usage, "jockey," the rider of a race horse, refers to "riding someone," which commonly means to harass or ridicule a person. Primarily heard in US. I wish you wouldn't be such a bench jockey at our games!
See also: bench, jockey

bench trial

In law, a trial in which the judge decides the outcome, as opposed to a jury. In an unusual turn of events, the defendant indicated that he wanted a bench trial, waving his right to a trial by jury. Most of these types of administrative cases are settled by bench trial, with the judge simply hearing both sides of the argument and examining the relevant evidence.
See also: bench, trial

bench warmer

An athlete who does not get much playing time (usually because they are not very good or skilled). I'm just a bench warmer, so you won't see me out on the court much.
See also: bench, warmer

benchmark

Something against which to measure success or progress. We have several benchmarks that will help us to determine if your portfolio is experiencing solid growth. I'm so happy to share that I've reached the benchmark of six months of sobriety!

deep bench

1. sports A large number of skilled players on a team who are available to play. Their star player may be injured, but they still have a deep bench they can turn to while she recovers. Their deep bench bailed them out last night, but they really can't afford to have their stars sidelined with penalties like that on a regular basis.
2. By extension, a large team of very skilled people at a group's or company's disposal. Our law firm has a deep bench, so no matter your case, you can rest assured that the best attorneys in the country will be working on your behalf. The cancer center has been named the region's top medical facility five years in a row because of its deep bench of renowned physicians.
See also: bench, deep

empty the bench

sports To replace the entire starting lineup of a team with players who do not get as much playing time (and thus spend a lot of time sitting on the bench during the game). Ahead by 21 points heading into the fourth quarter, UCLA began emptying the bench and coasted to an easy victory. I always try to empty the bench if we have a substantial lead late in the game. It's important to get these younger players more major league experience before the playoffs.
See also: bench, empty

grab some bench

In sports, to sit on the bench during a game. After my costly error at first base, the coach told to me to grab some bench.
See also: bench, grab

have a deep bench

1. sports To have a large number of skilled players on the team who are available to play. Their star player may be injured, but they still have a deep bench they can turn to while she recovers.
2. By extension, to have a large team of very skilled people at a group's or company's disposal. Our law firm has a deep bench, so no matter your case, you can rest assured that the best attorneys in the country will be working on your behalf.
See also: bench, deep, have

on the bench

1. Acting as judge in a court case. I thought we had a good chance of winning, but Steinman is on the bench—there's no way he'll rule in our favor.
2. Of a player or players in a team sport, not currently in the game, but situated on the perimeter of the playing area (often literally seated on a bench). The term can refer to players who are available to play or those who are ineligible due to injury, etc. The players on the bench might have a big impact on this game if the starters need to come out. He's been on the bench all season due to problems with his hip.
See also: bench, on

take the bench

To be appointed as a judge in a court of law. The newest judge of the Supreme Court first took the bench in 1987. We are pleased to announce that Mr. Sherman Oaks will be taking the bench in our federal courthouse this February.
See also: bench, take

warm the bench

Of a player or players in a team sport, to be situated on the perimeter of the playing area (often literally seated on a bench) but not actively participating in play. The term can refer to players who are available to play or those who are ineligible due to injury, suspension, etc. The players warming the bench might have a big impact on this game if the starters need to come out. He's been warming the bench all season due to problems with his hip. If she gets another penalty, she'll be warming the bench for the rest of the game.
See also: bench, warm
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

on the bench

 
1. [of a judge] directing a session of court. I have to go to court tomorrow. Who's on the bench? It doesn't matter who's on the bench. You'll get a fair hearing.
2. sitting, waiting for a chance to play in a game. (In sports, such as basketball, football, soccer, etc.) Bill is on the bench now. I hope he gets to play. John played during the first quarter, but now he's on the bench.
See also: bench, on

warm the bench

Fig. [for a player] to remain out of play during a game—seated on a bench. John spent the whole game warming the bench. Mary never warms the bench. She plays from the beginning to the end.
See also: bench, warm
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

on the bench

1. Presiding as judge in a law court, as in Lawyers are very careful when Judge Brown is on the bench. This usage alludes to the seat occupied by a judge. [Late 1200s]
2. Waiting for a chance to participate; also, removed from participation. For example, Mary complained that all her colleagues were going to the sales conference while she was left on the bench . This usage comes from baseball and other sports, where players not deemed ready or competent to play sit on a bench watching the game. [Early 1900s]
See also: bench, on

warm the bench

Also, ride the bench. Be a secondary or substitute participant; wait one's turn to participate. For example, I can't wait till the head of accounting retires; I've been warming the bench for years . This expression comes from such sports as baseball and football, and their standard practice of having substitute players sit on a bench in case they are needed in a game. [Slang; early 1900s]
See also: bench, warm
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bench

1. tv. to take someone out of a ball game. The coach benched Jim, who injured his arm.
2. tv. to retire someone; to withdraw someone from something. The manager benched the entire sales staff for cheating on their expense reports.

bench jockey

n. a player who sits on the bench and calls out advice. The coach told all the bench jockeys to shut up.
See also: bench, jockey

bench warmer

n. a ballplayer who spends most of the game on the bench waiting to play; a second-rate player. You’ll never be anything but a bench warmer.
See also: bench, warmer

grab some bench

tv. go to the bench, during a game. The coach told Freddy to go grab some bench.
See also: bench, grab
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

take the bench

Law
1. To become a judge.
2. To preside in court: The judge took the bench to hear the plaintiff's motion.
See also: bench, take
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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