beg the question

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Related to Begs the question: petitio principii

beg the question

1. To provoke a specific question (which typically follows this phrase). If he has a great job but is always broke, it begs the question of where the money is going?
2. To assume or believe that something is true when its veracity is unverified. My opponent in this debate has again begged the question, assuming his premise to be true without evidence.
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beg the question

 
1. to carry on a false argument where one assumes as proved the very point that is being argued, or more loosely, to evade the issue at hand. (Essentially a criticism of someone's line of argument.) Stop arguing in circles. You're begging the question. A: Why do two lines that are equidistant from one another never meet? B: Because they are parallel. A: You are begging the question.
2. to invite the (following) question. (This reinterpretation of beg the question is incorrect but is currently in widespread use.) His complaints beg the question: Didn't he cause all of his problems himself?
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beg the question

Take for granted or assume the truth of the very thing being questioned. For example, Shopping now for a dress to wear to the ceremony is really begging the question-she hasn't been invited yet . This phrase, whose roots are in Aristotle's writings on logic, came into English in the late 1500s. In the 1990s, however, people sometimes used the phrase as a synonym of "ask the question" (as in The article begs the question: "What are we afraid of?").
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beg the question

COMMON
1. If something begs the question, it makes people want to ask that question. Hopewell's success begs the question, why aren't more companies doing the same? When pushed to explain, words — for once — failed the England manager, begging the obvious question: Does he really know?
2. If someone's statement begs the question, they can only make that statement if a particular thing is true, although it may not be. His position on global warming is begging the question that humans are responsible. Note: This is a rough translation of the Latin expression `petitio principii', a technical term used in logic to describe a situation in which the truth of something is assumed before it has been proved.
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beg the question

1 raise a point that has not been dealt with; invite an obvious question. 2 assume the truth of an argument or of a proposition to be proved, without arguing it.
The original meaning of the phrase beg the question belongs to the field of logic and is a translation of Latin petitio principii , literally meaning ‘laying claim to a principle’, i.e. assume the truth of something that ought to be proved first. For many traditionalists this remains the only correct meaning, but far commoner in English today is the first sense here, ‘invite an obvious question’.
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beg the ˈquestion


1 make somebody want to ask a question that has not yet been answered: All of which begs the question as to who will fund the project.
2 talk about something as if it were definitely true, even though it might not be: This proposal begs the question of whether a change is needed at all. ▶ ˈquestion-begging noun, adj.: a question-begging argument
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beg the question

1. To assume to be true what one is purporting to prove in an argument.
2. To call to mind a question in a discussion; invite or provoke a question.
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beg the question, to

To assume that the very matter being questioned is true. A point of logic originally raised by Aristotle, it became a Latin proverb, Petitio principii, meaning “to beg the main point” (or “assume without proof ”). It was most clearly defined by Thomas Reid (Aristotle’s Logic, 1788): “Begging the question is when the thing to be proved is assumed in the premises.” Since about 1990, however, it has sometimes been used differently, to mean avoiding a straight answer, as “Using a round table begs the question of who is paired with whom.” An even more recent usage is as a synonym of “to raise the question,” as in “King’s new e-book begs the question of what constitutes a book.” Because of these confusions of meaning, this cliché is best avoided in clear discourse or writing.
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beg the question

To assume the question in your answer. For example, if the question is “Should marijuana use be criminalized?” to reply “Yes, because if it isn't, then lots of criminals will be roaming the streets” is to beg the question. That is, the answer assumes that pot users are criminals when that's the precise question under debate. Although the phrase is now widely heard as a synonym for raising or asking a question, its original meaning is still used by the dwindling band of educated speakers.
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References in periodicals archive ?
How, this begs the questions, "Can universities tap into this character development process?
The "extension" rationale begs the question of whether, without material tax information, a taxpayer can even make a bona fide and reasonable estimate of his liability required for a valid extension (Crocker, 92 TC 899 (1989)).
This clearly emphasizes the importance of each step in the educational process and begs the question of where do the most gaps in patient education occur?
Of course, Moir says, having this technology begs the question, "What do you do if you find oil?" After all, he points out, it's still buried, its quantity is unknown, and it might be near-impossible to retrieve.
This begs the question, why can Manchester build a tramline from the city centre to the airport, but Liverpool cannot build a line one to two miles from Liverpool South Parkway station to Liverpool Airport?
Mp a a h And it begs the question: Now that Owen has moved into broadcasting, will he find his natural home on Radio Norwich?
It simply begs the question which many people have raised in this newspaper - just precisely what is the point of Prince Harry within the armed forces?
With a view to this information, it begs the question how long will it be before a dog control order is put in place in Stewart Park?
This begs the question: If he has little or no experience of playing the sport at the top level, what qualifies him to be a commentator on the BBC?
I feel as I read about tragic cases such as Ryan and others like Khyra Ishaq, it really begs the question of should we bring back capital punishments for abusers of children, and should social services be put on trial for the lack of support and care to these children and prevent abuse like this happening?
Which begs the question why are we spending millions when we have a financial crisis when it is so ineffectual?
Which begs the question - what sport was notoriously heavy smoker Minister Cullen pursuing when he injured his back?
It then begs the question why has his master Mr Ieuan Wyn Jones, the Deputy First Minister no less, been so quiet on this issue.
It begs the question why judges bother to hand down sentences if they can be so dramatically cut short.
There's an element of truth to this but it isn't a legitimate adaptationist explanation because it begs the question of why the mind should find comfort in beliefs that are false.