Barmecide feast

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Related to Barmecide: Barmecide Feast

Barmecide feast

That which pretends or is imagined to be extravagant, plentiful, or opulent, but which in reality is comprised of little or nothing; that which proves to be illusory or unreal. Taken from the name of a prince in Arabian Nights who offers a feast to a beggar but gives him only empty plates. The money you make on the stock market can end up as a Barmecide feast: you think you're making millions of dollars, and then in the blink of an eye it is all gone.
See also: feast
References in classic literature ?
"Eat as much as you want," said the Barmecide. "I bought the woman who makes it for five hundred pieces of gold, so that I might never be without it."
After ordering a variety of dishes (which never came) to be placed on the table, and discussing the merits of each one, the Barmecide declared that having dined so well, they would now proceed to take their wine.
All the while Schacabac was treated by the Barmecide as a familiar friend, and dressed in a garment out of his own wardrobe.
Twenty years passed by, and my brother was still living with the Barmecide, looking after his house, and managing his affairs.
Barmecide: (a) brief in speech (b) illusory or imaginary (c) tax on salt (d) abusive language 10.
(84.) East/West, "A Barmecide Feast," March 13, 1968, 2; Daryl Maeda, Rethinking the Asian American Movement (New York: Routledge, 2012), 1-26; William Wei, The Asian American Movement (Philadelphia, Pa.: Temple University Press, 1993), 11-43.
Moore's prescient comment decades ago that "Lawrence made barmecide love to [Cynthia] in his stories" (Beauman 162, Moore 452), and it is helpful to consider the incisiveness of Moore's precise but forgotten metaphor.
I asked for lamb and pistachio-nuts, and cream tarts au poivre.' Lamb and pistachio nuts constituted the Barmecide's dinner in 'The Tale of the Hunchback', while 'cream-tarts au poivre' alludes to the story of Noureddin Ali and Bedreddin Hassan.
That night, on going to bed, I forgot to prepare in imagination the Barmecide supper, of hot roast potatoes, or white bread and new milk, with which I was wont to amuse my inward cravings.
Alfred Day, its 1924 founder, was also a racehorse trainer who saddled a horse called Barmecide to win the 1893 Goodwood Cup and planted a replica of the Versailles maze in his garden.
So she made the hard choice to be a different kind of poet--to write more closely within the language of the larger black community, to tone down the surprises, the startling words like "barmecide' and "thaumaturgic,' the sure coinages like "elsetime' and "singlicity.' The occasional remnants of her old cryptic compression are unobtrusively submerged in the directness of her call to those she wants to reach.
Jamel Eddine Bencheikh, in his study of "historical and mythical Baghdad' shows how Arabian Nights redactors borrowed love-story motifs from pre-Islamic Iraq and applied them to historical personages such as the caliphal vizier Ja[CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]far the Barmecide and [CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]Abbasa, sister of Harun al-Rashid.
But McLaughlin's is a Barmecide feast, whereas Childers' spread provides genuine nourishment.